Florida Senior Consulting is now an in-network referral partner for major market health providers through CarePort

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Florida Senior Consulting

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Dec 01, 2022

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Florida - Orlando , Florida - Sarasota, Bradenton & Charlotte Counties , Florida - Southwest

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Florida Senior Consulting is now an in-network referral partner for major market health providers through CarePort


Florida Senior Consulting, based in Sarasota county, is proud to announce they are now an in-network service provider through CarePort.

CarePort is the “best practices” referral network utilized by entities such as Sarasota Memorial Hospital, Lee Memorial Health System, Encompass, HCA, and Moffitt Cancer Center.

CarePort is a referral service platform that guides patient decision-making during discharge and increases referrals to top-performing, high quality providers. Thousands of providers across the U.S. use CarePort to better coordinate and manage patient care.

CarePort has worked with 14 million people in 2,000 hospitals across the country. They handle 41 million referrals per year.

Florida Senior Consulting has the distinct designation of being the only care management and placement agency in Florida to become an in-network referral partner through CarePort.



For more information, visit floridaseniorconsulting.com.

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