A PET TRUST AND WHY IT IS IMPORTANT

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Amy McGarry Law Office

For more information about the author, click to view their website: Amy McGarry Law Office

Posted on

Aug 01, 2023

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Florida - Southwest

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Did you know that a pet trust is an estate planning vehicle that can allow you to establish a plan for your pet’s care in the event that you are unable to care for him or her because of your death or incapacity? In the pet trust, you can identify a caregiver for your pet, you can set aside assets to pay for your pet’s care, and you can select a trustee to manage those assets and distribute them to your pet’s caregiver to benefit your pet. A pet trust also allows you to specify the type of care you want your pet to receive, including preferred veterinarians, specifications regarding daily care and grooming, instructions for boarding, and even end of life care.

Pet trusts can be beneficial for a variety of pet owners. For example, if you are the sole caregiver for your pet, you could implement a pet trust so that, if something happens to you, your pet will not wind up in a shelter. If you own a pet with a long life-span, like a horse or a bird, the possibility that your pet outlives you may be very real and a pet trust can help ensure that you can plan for your pet’s care for the duration of his or her life.

If implementing a pet trust seems right for you, make sure you enlist the help of an experienced estate planning attorney to incorporate the pet trust into your estate plan. Many states have specific limitations and restrictions on establishing a pet trust, and your attorney can help you navigate the applicable rules and put the most effective pet trust in place. Your attorney can also help you decide how to incorporate any balance remaining in the trust after your pet’s death into the rest of your estate plan so that no assets are wasted.

To learn more about establishing a pet trust and other useful estate planning tools, please contact our office to schedule an appointment.

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Local Services By This Author

Amy McGarry Law Office

Elder Law 1708 Cape Coral Parkway West, Cape Coral, Florida, 33914

Your Local Law Firm has proudly served Southwest Florida, including Cape Coral and Fort Myers, for 27 years. Specializing in estate planning, long-term care planning, and probate, we strive to build lasting relationships with our clients at every stage of life's journey.With over 100 Medicaid applications submitted, 1,500 custom estate plans completed, and 200 probate and trust administrations closed, we have the experience and expertise to guide you through these important legal processes.Our team is dedicated to providing caring and personalized support. Since our founding in 1997, we have maintained a commitment to creating a warm, family-friendly environment where clients receive the trusted guidance they deserve.Led by Board Certified Elder Law Attorney Amy McGarry, our firm offers expertise in elder care law, ensuring that older adults receive the specialized legal assistance they need. Whether you require estate planning, probate assistance, or guidance on long-term care planning and Medicaid, we are here to help.Plan for the future with Amy McGarry Law Office. We are dedicated to serving the legal needs of the Southwest Florida community with integrity, compassion, and excellence.