A Smile Is The Curve That Sets Everything Straight

Posted on

Oct 20, 2017

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In 2015, Senior Charity Care Foundation addressed the challenge of providing accessible and affordable dental care by starting its own mobile clinic.
Since July 2017, SCCF has added dentures services and semi-permanent crowns to the services provided.

Dental care is an often-neglected service for many seniors. Unlike traditional medical care, dental care is not covered by most insurance programs and is excluded from Medicare or Medicaid (except for blind and disabled) coverage. Without insurance, the cost of care can be simply too high for most seniors as they face decisions of whether to pay the rent or get dental care. Additionally, many seniors face issues getting to and from clinics, as the care they need might be several counties away and they do not have to the time or resources to get to a traditional dentist appointment.

As the senior population of Utah grows over the next two decades, the need for affordable and convenient dental care for seniors is becoming more important than ever. Senior Charity Care Foundation works to improve the quality of life for seniors in need by finding alternatives to market rate dental care. With 110 clinic days planned for 2017 and hosted in senior apartments and care facilities in seven Utah counties, Senior Charity Care Foundation is trying to take a bite out of the issue.

In addition to dental care, Senior Charity Care Foundation also helps to provide eyeglasses and hearing aids and works with Friends for Sight and Jewish Family Service to link seniors to other resources they may need by hosting monthly Senior Socials throughout unincorporated Salt Lake County.

Here is what one patient said about our services. "I didn't know who I could turn to. They helped me learn to hold my head up high, and Im changing my attitude. You all are awesome. Thank you for helping us have a better life than we had."

Editors Note: This article was submitted by Aaron Ershler. Aaron is an AmeriCorps VISTA member with Senior Charity Care Foundation and can be reached at 801-468-6806 or aaron.ershlersccf@gmail.com

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