AdaptFocus - An Advocate for Those With Ambulatory Disabilities

Author

AdaptFocus

For more information about the author, click to view their website: Adapt Focus

Posted on

Aug 13, 2022

Book/Edition

Alabama - Gulf Coast

AdaptFocus

My name is DeQuel Robinson, I’m a native of Mobile, AL and I currently work as a Program Supervisor for Mobile Parks & Recreation, a Track & Field Coach/Personal Trainer, and Doctoral student.

I’m also a former Pro Wheelchair Basketball Athlete. I’ve lived with an Ambulatory (Physical) Disability since the Fall of 2008. Prior to that date, I was a star athlete in Football & Track & Field.  Sports has always been my passion and love since the age of 5. Who would have thought that the two sports I love so dearly would be taken away from me at the young age of 21.

In the Fall of 2008, October 18th, my life changed forever when I was shot 7 times and left for dead. God truly had His hands on me because He covered me while being on the ground an hour in a half and gave me the strength to dial 911.

The multiple gun shots left me partially paralyzed from the waist down. That didn’t stop me from developing a focus mindset and thriving ahead, tapping into my purpose. After being confined to a wheelchair, I was able to create a path for myself through sports and fitness.

I became involved in wheelchair activities and earned a wheelchair basketball scholarship to The University of Alabama. During my tenure at the University of Alabama, I earned my Bachelor’s and Master’s degrees and became a 2-Time Intercollegiate National Champion.

Upon completing my master’s degree, I furthered my career in wheelchair basketball by accepting an offer to play professionally in France. After completing my time overseas, I moved back to the great city of Mobile, Alabama to fulfill my purpose by helping others like myself and by creating my Nonprofit Organization, AdaptFocus.

AdaptFocus is a Nonprofit Organization whose mission is:

  • Help and empower those with Ambulatory (Physical) Disabilities through Athletics, Fitness and Recreational Programs within the community, while also providing mentorship to those faced with sudden physical challenges.
  • Creating a pathway for those with physical disabilities, who are looking to further their goals & dreams through sports and activities.
  • Removing barriers so that everyone has an equal opportunity to enjoy any and all activities to live a more active independent lifestyle.


AdaptFocus is dedicated to helping and serving the community in a way that truly makes a difference on our grand vision, “Adapting Forward Without Limitations”.

Contact DeQuel Robinson for more information about the non-profit, AdaptFocus at adaptfocus21@gmail.com or AdaptFocus.org.

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Local Services By This Author

AdaptFocus

Disability Services , Mobile, Alabama, 36608

AdaptFocus is a non-profit organization whose mission is to advocate and empower those with Ambulatory (Physical) Disabilities through Athletics, Fitness, and Recreational Programs.  AdaptFocus creates an inclusive society within the community that truly benefits all.  This organization removes barriers to that everyone has an equal opportunity to enjoy any and all activities.Donations  can be made at: Cashapp: $AdaptFocus or PayPal: AdaptFocus21