Grandparent Scams | Fraud is on the Rise

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Lori Williams - Senior Services

Posted on

Sep 04, 2022

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Texas - Dallas, Collin, SE Denton & Rockwall Counties

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Grandparent Scams and Fraud are on the RISE!

Fraud is on the rise, and one of the most popular scams is the Grandparent Scam. This scam hit close to home when my step-father, who lives in Mississippi received an odd call from a man claiming to be my son. The caller had greeted him with, “Hi Grandpa, it’s Chris. I’ve been in a car accident, I’m bleeding and in jail. I need you to call my lawyer.” The caller sounded a bit like my son, but it made no sense that he would be calling his grandpa two states away for help. I checked in on my son, who was sound asleep in his bed and had not been in an accident. My step-father had been the target of a Grandparent Scam! 

Grandparent Scams involve an imposter posing as a grandchild who is in trouble: they’ve been in an accident, or arrested. Once they have the grandparent concerned and ready to help, they hand the phone off to another scammer posing as a police officer or lawyer who then will make arrangements to have the grandparent wire money to them. 

This scam is on the rise, but you can protect yourself by following these 5 tips: 

1) Set privacy settings on your social media accounts. 

2) Ask questions that only your grandchild could answer. 

3) Tell the caller you will call them back, then call your grandchild’s cell number. 

4) Contact other family members to verify the story. 

5) Trust your gut instinct. 

Fraud targeting older people should be reported to the FTC at 877-382-4357. 




Article submitted by Lori Williams with Lori Williams Senior Services

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Finding senior housing for yourself or for a loved one can be a time-consuming and stressful process. You can search google and find a senior community that sounds perfect, only to find out later that its way beyond your budget...or not the right fit for your loved ones care needs. We are here to help. Lori Williams Senior Services is a completely free senior living advisement service. Our senior experts are locally based, know the senior living options in the area, and are dedicated to helping you find the right solution for yourself or your family member.How It Works PHONE CONSULTATIONDuring our phone consultation, our objective is to learn as much as we can about your senior loved one.  We will ask questions about their day to day experience, health concerns, personality, interests/hobbies, budget and desired geographic location. This helps us determine which senior community or services will be the best fit.HOUSING/CARE OPTIONSWe create a custom list of options that fit your loved ones unique needs. We go over each option together in detail, and schedule a date/time for you to visit the community. We are dedicated to helping you find the right fit for your loved one. GUIDANCEWe stay in contact with you as you visit senior communities, carefully listening to your feedback and fine tuning your search as needed until we find the perfect solution. There can be a lot of moving parts as you transition to senior living and we can help with that too. We can connect you with realtors who work specifically with seniors, estate sale companies, packers/movers, and more.