Hearing Loss and Tinnitus

Posted on

Nov 01, 2019

Signs of hearing loss include asking people to repeat what they have said, hearing but not understanding speech, and trouble communicating in the presence of background noise.
Tinnitus is also a sign of hearing loss. Many people report hearing ringing, buzzing, humming and cricket sounds. Nearly 50 million Americans experience some type of hearing loss, with approximately 20 million dealing with some type of Tinnitus.
Tinnitus is your brains reaction to a loss of signal from your ear, its not a disease in and of itself, but rather a symptom.
Do you experience symptoms of Tinnitus, but have been told that you will just have to live with it? Although there is no cure, Susan has developed her own unique, proven treatment options. Over the past 20 years, Susan has had the opportunity to help hundreds of patients, by listening to each of their needs and treating symptoms individually.
This article was submitted by Susan Baker. Susan is the owner/operator at Advanced Hearing Services and may be reached at (970) 221-5249 or by email at susan@advancedhearing.net with any questions.

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