Heart Disease Vs. Stroke

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Physicians Regional Healthcare System

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Posted on

Jul 18, 2023

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Florida - Southwest

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Stroke and coronary heart disease (CHD) are two different conditions. However, these ailments develop and affect the body similarly. In addition, heart disease and stroke have a tragic connection. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, both are leading causes of death for American women.

A stroke results from interrupted or reduced blood supply to the brain. The most common is an ischemic stroke—when blood vessels are narrowed by fat deposits or blocked by clots. Blockages prevent oxygen-rich blood from reaching the brain.

CHD affects the arteries of the heart. It develops over time as plaque accumulates and narrows the arteries — a process called atherosclerosis. A heart attack can occur when little-to-no blood reaches the heart.

If you have atherosclerosis in your coronary arteries, chances are that other arteries in your body have experienced narrowing, too—including the brain. Risks for atherosclerosis include high cholesterol and triglyceride levels, hypertension, smoking, diabetes, obesity, and diets high in saturated fat. If you modify these risk factors, you may be able to protect yourself from two serious health threats.

Timeline and Symptoms

If you experience stroke or heart attack symptoms, it is vital to seek swift medical treatment.

According to Johns Hopkins, irreversible damage can happen within 30 minutes of blood oxygen cut-off, and heart cells start to die. Heart attack symptoms include shortness of breath and chest pain accompanied by pain in the arm, neck, jaw or back. You might also feel faint or experience cold sweats.

Similarly, the longer the brain is without oxygenated blood, the more likely irreparable damage becomes. If untreated, ischemic strokes can last 10 hours and age your brain up to 36 years. Several studies claim you lose 2 million brain cells every minute a stroke goes untreated. Symptoms of a stroke are facial numbness or weakness on one side of the body, severe headache with no known cause, sudden coordination trouble and difficulty speaking or understanding speech.

If you suspect you or a loved one is having a heart attack or stroke, don’t waste a precious second — call 911 immediately.

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Local Services By This Author

Physicians Regional Healthcare System

Hospitals 6101 Pine Ridge Rd., Naples, Florida, 34119

Physicians Regional Healthcare System's two Naples hospitals provide quality care to the Naples and the greater Southwest Florida community with the objective of offering more options and improved access to healthcare for all citizens and visitors. Our two Naples hospitals and more than 300 physicians are recognized within their fields, offering advanced medical care in more than 45 specialties and subspecialties, including programs in 24-hour emergency care, cardiology, vascular disease, digestive diseases, research, orthopedic care, spine care, neurosurgery, and women's services.Physicians Regional - Collier Boulevard and Physicians Regional - Pine Ridge are conveniently located near where you live and work.Service Offerings Include:(Click a service to learn more)Bariatric Weight Loss ServicesCancer CareColorectal CareCritical Care MedicineDermatology ServicesDigestive HealthEmergency ServicesEndocrinologyGastroenterologyHeart CareInfectious Disease CareKidney DisordersLaboratory ServicesNeurologyOrthopedic ServicesPain ManagementPrimary CarePulmonology CareRadiologyRehabilitation ServicesRheumatologyStroke CareSurgical ServicesUrologyVein Care CenterWomen's HealthWound CareTo see which medical center or hospital is closest to you, CLICK HERE, to view all locations!

Physicians Regional Healthcare System

Physicians 6101 Pine Ridge Rd., Naples, Florida, 34119

Physicians Regional Healthcare System's two Naples hospitals provide quality care to the Naples and the greater Southwest Florida community with the objective of offering more options and improved access to healthcare for all citizens and visitors. Our two Naples hospitals and more than 300 physicians are recognized within their fields, offering advanced medical care in more than 45 specialties and subspecialties, including programs in 24-hour emergency care, cardiology, vascular disease, digestive diseases, research, orthopedic care, spine care, neurosurgery, and women's services.Physicians Regional - Collier Boulevard and Physicians Regional - Pine Ridge are conveniently located near where you live and work.Service Offerings Include:(Click a service to learn more)Bariatric Weight Loss ServicesCancer CareColorectal CareCritical Care MedicineDermatology ServicesDigestive HealthEmergency ServicesEndocrinologyGastroenterologyHeart CareInfectious Disease CareKidney DisordersLaboratory ServicesNeurologyOrthopedic ServicesPain ManagementPrimary CarePulmonology CareRadiologyRehabilitation ServicesRheumatologyStroke CareSurgical ServicesUrologyVein Care CenterWomen's HealthWound CareTo see which medical center or hospital is closest to you, CLICK HERE, to view all locations!