Home Care for Seniors with Dementia

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Visiting Angels Florida West Coast

For more information about the author, click to view their website: Visiting Angels

Posted on

Dec 04, 2023

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Florida - Sarasota, Bradenton & Charlotte Counties , Florida - Southwest

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Caring for senior loved ones with dementia can be both rewarding and extremely exhausting. While we strive to do everything we can for them and want to be a part of their care as much as possible, it can start to take a toll on us. That is where home care for people with dementia can help. 

Having an in-home caregiver can help provide relief for family members and friends while at the same time providing personalized care and support for dementia patients within the comfort of their own homes. Professional home care workers, such as those with Visiting Angels Punta Gorda, can come into the home as much or as little as you like to help your senior loved one. They can supplement the care that family members offer, or family members can supplement the care they give. Home care workers also can help with specific tasks or all of the day-to-day tasks your senior needs.

Here are some ways home care can help your senior loved one with dementia and also help family members on this care journey.

Everyday Needs

Professionals with home care agencies can help dementia patients with activities of daily living, including bathing, getting dressed and undressed each morning and night, grooming, using the toilet, eating and more. Often dementia patients resist showers. Home care workers skilled in working with memory loss patients can help them at least clean up each day. By helping with these tasks, they can help ensure their safety, health and hygiene are cared for. Home care workers can help them feel more like themselves throughout the day with brushed hair and teeth, clean clothes and a clean environment.

Safety

While in-home caregivers are present in the home, they will help ensure your senior loved one suffering from dementia is safe. They can help ensure they don’t wander from the home or leave the stove burner on after cooking something. If family members cannot always be there, home care workers can alert them to anything that might be a safety hazard, such as a loose rug, wobbly banister or door that your senior loved one keeps unlocking and trying to leave from. If your senior loved one needs more stability during their bathing, caregivers can let the family know they might need to install grab bars. They also can provide a steady hand for seniors and avoid any dangerous areas, such as cords, that could cause potential tripping hazards. Dementia patients may not remember to let their families know what they need or even be aware that it is a concern, so home care workers can provide an extra level of safety protection for them. 

Companionship

Having a homecare worker present can offer seniors with dementia constant companionship. People suffering from dementia often can become isolated or feel lonely, which can worsen their symptoms. Some symptoms of dementia include aggressiveness and/or crabbiness. Dementia patients have been known to push their family members away or to act hostile. A home care worker can provide companionship and support for senior citizens, especially when family members feel like retreating or that they need a break. They can listen to their stories, ask them questions and engage the patient in meaningful social activities to improve their emotional well-being.

Relieving the family

There is no doubt that caring for a loved one with dementia brings with it a ton of emotions and lots of stress. It also can place family members in situations they are not comfortable with. If children feel uncomfortable doing some of the caregiving for their parents, such as bathing or toileting, a home care worker can do the essentials so family members can simply spend time with them. They also can help with some of the more frustrating tasks so that family members don’t lose patience and so that clients do not take out their frustration on their family members. Homecare workers also can provide respite care, which means family members can leave the home or caregiving duties for a short period of time. They can go out to coffee with a friend to refresh, have a nice dinner out without worrying about hurrying back to help their loved one, or they can even just take a peaceful nap at home with the help of respite care. Respite care can also provide short-term relief for a weekend away or an extended vacation.

We Can Help

If you are looking for help caring for your senior this spring and every season of the year, our professionals at Visiting Angels Punta Gorda are here to help. We provide a variety of home care services, including companion care, fall prevention and more. 

Our expert team of caregivers serves clients in Punta Gorda, North Fort Myers, Boca Grande, Cape Coral, Sanibel, Captiva, Arcadia and surrounding areas. To learn more about our services, call us at 941-347-8288, or contact us online.

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