How to Move a Parent with Dementia into Assisted Living

Author

Calusa Harbour

Posted on

Jul 27, 2021

Book/Edition

Florida - Southwest

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For more information on the author Calusa Harbour - Five Star Senior Living, CLICK HERE.
When a parent has Alzheimer's or another type of dementia, adult children may struggle to keep them safe and engaged at home. It is a difficult condition to navigate, especially if family members work outside the home. From nutritional struggles to concerns about wandering, caring for a loved one with dementia can be all-consuming. It sometimes leads families to explore memory care assisted living programs in hopes of improving the seniors quality of life and their safety.
A specialty dementia care program, like the Bridge to Rediscovery at Five Star, meets the residents where they are looking at their current abilities to create a lifestyle that supports engagement so that they can enjoy their best quality of life. These programs also provide a secure environment that supports freedom while reducing the risk of wandering.
But for many adult children, the idea of moving a parent with memory loss to an assisted living community can create stress and anxiety. It can also lead loved ones to feel guilty about their inability to manage a parents care at home.
How can you help a senior loved one with dementia successfully transition to a new environment? We have some tips you might find useful.
4 Tips for Moving a Parent with Dementia

Make it familiar: For people with memory loss, being surrounded by familiar things helps to decrease their stress and anxiety. This becomes more difficult to do as the dementia progresses, so it takes thoughtful planning. Think about the items your parent uses and touches most often. Maybe its a throw they cover up with in their favorite chair. Or it could be a cherished photo from their wedding day. Try to recreate their home environment in their new assisted living apartment or suite. Hang their bathrobe up in a place they immediately notice it. Cover their bed with a quilt or comforter they might recognize. Place family photos all around the apartment before they arrive. Whatever belongings signal home to your parent are important to incorporate into their new space. One of the signatures of Five Stars Bridge to Rediscovery Memory Care program is the keepsake box that includes special mementos. Our community team will teach you how to create one for your loved one.
Moving time matters: Adults with Alzheimer's and other forms of dementia usually have good and bad times of day. While the disease can be unpredictable, it will help to schedule a move to coincide with their best time of day. For many seniors with dementia, morning is the easiest time, especially if they experience sundowners syndrome. If possible, have a relocation company or loved ones move belongings while you keep your parent occupied. Once the new apartment is settled, you can introduce them to their new residence. We have shadow boxes displaying our residents pictures and item of personal interest by the entrance to their residence to make it easy to locate and to give a reassuring feeling of belonging.
Create a reminiscence board: When a senior has dementia, they may have difficulty with verbal skills. This makes it more challenging for the staff to get to know them. You can help by creating a reminiscence board or scrapbook with photos of family members along with names and descriptions. Share it with the team members ahead of time so they can look it over before your parents arrival. Once they move in, you can keep it in a prominent place in the apartment to share with staff and visitors. Our Bridge to Rediscovery neighborhoods help the family to complete a detailed life narrative. We learn all about each individuals story, their career, their hobbies, their like and dislikes and more. This helps make the transition much more comfortable for everyone.
Music as therapy: Many people find the healing harmonies of music to be beneficial. This is true for adults with dementia, too. During this time of transition, play some of their favorite music softly in the background. This can help decrease the anxiety your loved one is likely feeling and unable to verbalize. Set up a small CD player with a few of their favorite musicians. Ask the care team to turn it on when you cant be there.

When to Make a Transition to Dementia Care
Finally, if you are wondering how to tell if it is time for your parent to move to a memory care community, we have a resource that can help you decide. Click on the link above to speak to someone about making a move to dementia care assisted living.

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Visits to Memory Care

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Local Services By This Author

Calusa Harbour

Independent Living 2525 First St., Fort Myers, Florida, 33901

Calusa Harbour is a Five Star Senior Living Community in Fort Myers, FL, offering a luxurious and vibrant senior living experience. Nestled along the Caloosahatchee River, our community provides breathtaking views and a cruise-like ambiance, making every day feel like a vacation. Whether you're painting a watercolor of the skyline, enjoying Happy Hour with friends, or dancing in the ballroom, Calusa Harbour offers endless opportunities for adventure and socializing.We provide a wide range of living options, including Assisted Living, Independent Living, Outpatient Rehabilitation, and Respite Care/Short Term Stays, with monthly rental rates starting at $2,200. Our community is designed to cater to your every need, with charmingly designed living spaces that tie all your expenses into one neat monthly payment.At Calusa Harbour, we prioritize your independence and well-being. Our dedicated team of professionals has been serving the community for over 40 years, ensuring that you receive the care and support you deserve. Whether you're relaxing in our courtyard garden, exploring literary classics in the library, or enjoying a cocktail by the pool, Calusa Harbour is your home, where you can live life on your own terms.Join us at Calusa Harbour and experience senior living at its finest. Schedule a tour today to see why our residents love calling Calusa Harbour home.

Calusa Harbour

Assisted Living 2525 First St., Fort Myers, Florida, 33901

Calusa Harbour is a Five Star Senior Living Community in Fort Myers, FL, offering a luxurious and vibrant senior living experience. Nestled along the Caloosahatchee River, our community provides breathtaking views and a cruise-like ambiance, making every day feel like a vacation. Whether you're painting a watercolor of the skyline, enjoying Happy Hour with friends, or dancing in the ballroom, Calusa Harbour offers endless opportunities for adventure and socializing.We provide a wide range of living options, including Assisted Living, Independent Living, Outpatient Rehabilitation, and Respite Care/Short Term Stays, with monthly rental rates starting at $2,200. Our community is designed to cater to your every need, with charmingly designed living spaces that tie all your expenses into one neat monthly payment.At Calusa Harbour, we prioritize your independence and well-being. Our dedicated team of professionals has been serving the community for over 40 years, ensuring that you receive the care and support you deserve. Whether you're relaxing in our courtyard garden, exploring literary classics in the library, or enjoying a cocktail by the pool, Calusa Harbour is your home, where you can live life on your own terms.Join us at Calusa Harbour and experience senior living at its finest. Schedule a tour today to see why our residents love calling Calusa Harbour home.