No One Wants to be a Number

Posted on

Sep 07, 2019

Years ago Charles Kuralt had a news segment called On the Road, which aired on CBS Evening News. Charles would stop in a city, grab a phone book from a telephone booth, and let his finger randomly stop at a name. He would then meet said person and conduct a life interview with them, and my recall is that in every interview he uncovered a fascinating person with a fascinating story.
It is with this approach that the staff at the Upper Arkansas Area Agency on Aging endeavor to work with our clients and their stories. Sometimes it is difficult, as time constraints, many tasks at hand, and client representation all need to be balanced. But when people leave our office and they carry themselves in a manner which reflects theyve been heard, we really feel we are doing a good job.
By the time an individual has experienced enough years to be considered elderly, they have gone through an incredible array of circumstances that have formed their being and who among us cannot take the time to learn something from every single person elderly or not -- we are fortunate enough to encounter?

Editors note: This article was submitted by Upper Arkansas Area Agency on Aging in Salida, CO. They may be reached at 719-539-3341 (or toll free at 877-610-3341) or by email at aaareg13@uaacog.com

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