Planning For The Unexpected

Posted on

Nov 15, 2019

We all know there are certain things we can take for granted such as death and taxes. We should also expect the unexpected. Consequently, I think it is helpful to do a simple self-assessment of what plans you have in place if the unexpected happens, as it will.
For example: Do I have in place adequate powers of attorney that allow trusted persons to make decisions for me? Do I have a will or have I planned for how my property will pass to those I want to have it? If I am in a blended family have I made plans to address the issues such situations frequently bring such as how will step-children be handled. What plans do I have in place to address the reality of my family dynamics? Am I suffering from a condition that might require assisted living or long-term care?
Asking these simple questions might reveal the need to do some planning or to address changed circumstances which have arisen since the original plans were made. The time to do this is now while there is time and while you can be in control of your destiny. Dont assume your family will make the choices you would because it is very possible they will not.
What to do then? Plan for the unexpected. Consult with the necessary professionals today so that the unexpected does not catch you unawares. The decisions you make today will affect your family tomorrow; help them to enact your wishes by giving them the tools they need to implement your plans for both life and death. The problems will not just go away.
Editors Note: This article was submitted by William H. Moller, Attorney and Counselor at Law, The Moller Law Group, LLC. He may be reached at 719-694-1284, or by email at whmoller@mollerlawgroup.com.

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