SBB University presents: Home? A Retirement Community? What is the Best Option for Me?

Posted on

Nov 20, 2020

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It is important that everyone think ahead and to consider where and how you might like to age.

Join SBB University and our panel of experts as we arm you with knowledge on how to evaluate your living situation and make a plan while you are still healthy.Topics of discussion at this informative event included identifying where the best place is for you to live as you age - it could be moving into a beautiful senior living community or developing a course of action to help you age in place safely in your home for as long as possible. We explore how to get all of your legal documents in order with clear intentions and how to ensure it's accessible when needed.

Panel 1: Options to assist with aging in place in your own home, downsizing, getting your legal paperwork in order



Panel 2: What do retirement/senior living communities have to offer?


To Learn More, Click Links Below:
ComForCare of NW Pittsburgh
LIFE Pittsburgh
Sharek Law Office
Karla Casertano - Realtor, Coldwell Banker
Presbyterian SeniorCare Network
Northland Heights Senior Living
The Helping Hand Personal Placement Agency

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