SBB's Senior Care Spotlight Presents "But I'm too Young!" to think about Retirement Living!

Posted on

Feb 02, 2021




We visited with Connie Buckwalter, Director of Marketing with Mennonite Home Communities which includes the beautiful Woodcrest Villa. Connie talks to us about "But I'm too Young!" Why Moving to a Community Earlier is Better! Come join us to learn! Connie Buckwalter, 717-390-4126, www.mennonitehome.org; www.woodcrestvilla.org; 1520 Harrisburg Pike, Lancaster PA 17601 #Retirement #RetirementLiving #SeniorsBlueBook #MennoniteHomeCommunities #WoodcrestVilla


Other Articles You May Like

Facing Change with Hope and Excitement

As we grow older, many of us become set in our ways. This is not necessarily bad, as we have learned what we like and dont. However, it can be unsettling when the time comes to make a major life change that disturbs our status quo. Fear of change is one of the most prevalent phobias in society and can be incredibly overwhelming for those who are faced with growing older and finding a new place to live.If you have a parent or elderly loved one who needs to be moved into a new residence to keep them safe whether it be your personal home or an assisted living facility you can expect some level of stress. We have recommendations to help your loved one face inevitable change with confidence, not fear.What Causes Fear of Change?The older we get, the more susceptible we are to being uncomfortable with change. Experts believe that the longer something exists, the more likely it is that people have positive feelings about it. The lifestyle that someone has lived for decades is often seen as the best possible option. Another reason may be that senior adults have experienced scenarios when a change turned out badly.Many circumstances may be behind an overwhelming or crippling fear of change. According to psychologists, these may include:Life changes and circumstances that result in emotional distressInsecurity or fear of not having enoughGuilt over anything in their lifeApprehension about meeting new peopleAnxiety about changes in ones circumstancesFear of failureFear of the past repeating itself, especially if there is a traumatic experienceA tendency to be oversensitiveFear surrounding change can cause behavioral changes and new thoughts that can adversely affect the quality of life. These may include:Preventing persons from making changes that are neededAvoiding any new situation, even if it sounds interestingTendency to self-isolateIndecisiveness or hesitancy to make choicesReluctance to consider potential options, no matter how viableTendency to define self-worth by outside opinionsDependence on acquiring material possessions7 Recommendations to Embrace Hope and ExcitementWhen your family member needs to make lifestyle changes in order to safeguard their health, happiness and security, they need encouragement and support so that they feel hope not fear.Help them to create a system of organization in their everyday tasks, so that their lives feel more feel stable. Once they feel safe, you can begin to incorporate small changes.Familiarize yourself with their anxiety symptoms so that you can recognize and address them.Remain positive in your communication and dont be discouraged by your parents negative attitude. Anticipate likely objections and be prepared to respond positively.Allow them to participate in researching the solution you are suggesting. People tend to fear and avoid what they do not understand or cannot control.Offer opportunities for them to get out and do fun things they enjoy.Take a break whenever it is needed. If they begin to get overwhelmed, back off and let them digest any information you presented.Change Can Be Positive and Exciting!When you are discussing a new living situation with your parents, there are many ways you can help them to accept the needed change- but if you think the solution is memory care or assisted living, you may need to conquer your own fears first.My Care Finders was founded with the goal of assisting families through this significant life change. Our knowledgeable and compassionate advisors are here to help you find the right community for your loved one and remember, our services are always free of charge.

How a Senior Residence Helps You Grow Stronger

How a Senior Residence Helps You Grow StrongerAssisted living and senior residences have come a long way, becoming places for seniors to thrive and grow. Lets take a look at some of the innovative ways that senior living communities help older adults to grow stronger, and become healthier and more vibrant.Wellness and Comprehensive Care ProgramsThe most beneficial communities for seniors offer wellness programs that address their specific needs and mobility capabilities. From tailored fitness plans and physical therapy sessions to community activities that encourage cognitive function, each program should be geared towards increasing vitality and strength. As a result, residents may experience a significant reverse in frailty as well as mental and physical decline.Grow Stronger Through Fitness and NutritionNutritious meals are key to successfully fighting off frailty as we age. Senior living communities provide residents with a well-balanced, nutrient-rich diet that is modified around specific dietary needs. This information will be outlined in their comprehensive care plan, which should be reviewed periodically for any new developments. Without proper nutrition, a senior cannot feel their best and grow stronger and assisted living communities can help.Engagement and Participation to Feel YoungerIsolation is one of the primary root causes of frailty in older adults. Trained caregivers in senior living communities are tasked with ensuring that each resident can participate in organizing a diverse calendar of activities that cultivate social bonds. Remaining engaged with others in the residence via events, games, entertainment and educational opportunities will significantly reduce feelings of loneliness and isolation. Not only that but interacting with others can boost cognitive function and develop a strong sense of community.Ready Access to HealthcareOne of the most common dangers of remaining at home is the potential of wandering or falling. As we grow older, however, having prompt access to healthcare is essential. By moving into a senior living community, residents can enjoy the convenience of onsite care services and experienced health care professionals. Being in close proximity allows better monitoring of a seniors health, allowing doctors to answer questions and offer preventative care, thus working to avoid frailty-related issues.Stimulation of Cognitive Processes Helps Us Grow StrongerKeeping the mind sharp and active is vital when combatting frailty. The advancement of knowledge in the area of cognitive and mental health has allowed care professionals to understand the human mind better than ever before. Assisted living and memory care centers can therefore structure games, educational programs and memory exercises that address each individuals unique needs. This level of personalization plays a vital role in supporting mental resilience and comprehensive mind-body wellness.Modified and Safe Living SpacesWhere we spend our days as we age greatly influences our level of declining frailty. Senior living facilities thoughtfully design living spaces that guarantee optimum safety, incorporating wide hallways, large print signs and water stations throughout the community. These adaptations all work to minimize the risk of accidents that may lead to weakness. Required modifications to apartments are then easily made as care needs develop and evolve, further supporting a healthy lifestyle.In other words, senior living residences are not just another random place to call home; they are vibrant, stimulating and engaging spaces where seniors can enjoy their golden years. By remaining active, interactive and healthy, they can actually grow stronger as time goes on.My Care Finders Can HelpAt My Care Finders, our professional team of senior care advisors works with families to determine the best residence for their loved one. If you need advice, knowledge or assistance, call us today. We are dedicated to the overall health and happiness of your senior family member.

How Walking Can Boost Your Brain Power

Your brain isnt exempt from the aging process. In fact, cognitive decline technically begins as early as your thirties. But that doesnt mean you should just give in and allow time to take its toll without a fight. You can slow and, in some ways, even regain some of your cognitive health. And the simple act of regular walking can play a key role in boosting your brain power.When you hit your 30s, your working memory begins to fade so that recalling bits of information and passwords becomes more of a challenge. By the time you slide into your 40s, you begin to lose brain volume at the rate of 5% per decade. And of course, this affects memory, recall, and focus.But a recent study suggests that you can reverse the deteriorating effects of aging on your brain. The study revealed that six months of regular, brisk walking improved more than just cardiovascular fitness. It also brought improvements to the brains white matter and memory. What does this mean for you? And how does walking impact dementia and overall age-related memory loss? Heres what we know.Walking Improves White Matter and MemoryThe study compared walking to other forms of exercise such as stretching, balancing, and choreographed dancing. The participants were healthy but inactive adults, over half being female. All were over the age of 60. They had no history of dementia, stroke, or other neurological issues.Researchers established their baseline measures in areas of cardiorespiratory fitness, memory, and processing skills. They also performed an MRI to capture the function and health of existing white matter. The participants engaged in exercise three times per week for six months. The walking group took a brisk 40-minute walk each session.At the end of the study, researchers repeated the brain tests for comparison.Walking Boosts Brain Power More Than DancingWalkers and dancers had better cardiovascular health after the six months of routine exercise. And researchers also found that both groups experienced improvements in white matter. But the positive changes in the white matter of the walking group were more prevalent. According to the MRIs, certain parts of the brain were larger and lesions (indicating damage to the brain) had shrunk during the study.Researchers targeted specific regions of the brain for measurement, regions that are more susceptible to decline during aging. The research is crucial to scientists, proving that white matter is responsive to change and is essentially pliable. Deterioration at this stage isnt necessarily fixed.Walking Is Good for Your Heart and BrainOnly the walking group experienced changes in white matter that were associated with improved memory. But researchers arent sure why walking had a greater impact on white matter and memory than dancing. Similar results were expected since both activities are moderate intensity cardiovascular exercises. Its possible that the instruction the dancers received kept them from more vigorous and constant movement. This means that the key to boosting memory power is aerobic exercise, constant movement with a steady supply of oxygen.Exercise that consistently elevates your heart rate is good for your heart, and research continues to reveal that what is good for your heart is good for your brain too. Aerobic exercise increases oxygen to all parts of your bodyincluding your brain. This increased oxygen can lower high blood pressure, one of the biggest risk factors for neurological diseases and dementia. And that risk is further diminished since routine physical activity also decreases stress and improves sleep, both of which impact memory.The study is also valuable since its one of the few of its kind that was conducted as a controlled trial. Previously, most studies asked participants to report activities they were already doing rather than coming to exercise in a controlled environment.What About Gray Matter?Most of the previous studies on physical activity and cognitive decline focused on gray matter, your brains outer layer where many of your neurons are concentrated. But this research zeroed in on the lesser studies aspect of your brainwhite matter. Its found in your brain's deeper tissues. White matter includes extensions of neurons called nerve fibers. While your gray matter can be likened to a light bulb and your white matter to the electrical wiring that carries the current.Yes, gray matter is important, but to battle cognitive decline and age-related memory loss, you also need to revitalize and support the white matter that keeps everything going. We now understand why walking is powerful for your brain as it impacts both white and gray matter.Time to Start Walking for Brain HealthWhite matter is prone to degeneration whether due to healthy aging or dementia. If you want to keep your mental acuity for as long as possible, consider adding some brisk walking to your schedule at least three days per week. If youre new to exercise or walking, its okay to start small work your way up to 30-40-minute sessions. This will give you maximum impact, especially if youre only walking a few times per week.But walking benefits your health far beyond boosting brain power. Check out our article, 7 Benefits of Walking that Might Surprise You.TYE Medical offers premium incontinence products in a variety of sizes and absorbencies. Shop our online store for free and discreet shipping on all orders