SENIOR LIVING 101: Truth About Costs

Posted on

Aug 15, 2019

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WHAT ARE THE MAJOR COSTS?
Whether youre looking for the first time at a long term solution or considering switching to a new facility, be informed about ALL the expenses in any community. The Radcliff wants you to make an informed decision when you are shopping and considering what is the best fit for yourself or loved one. Whether youre age 55, 95 or somewhere in between, the process can be confusing and overwhelming. The following are three common cost areas where you need to ask direct and honest questions of the facilities salesperson, and always compare and contrast from at least 2-3 locations before making a decision.
COMMUNITY FEE: UNNECESSARY HIDDEN UP-CHARGES
Most senior living facilities charge what is called a community fee. This may be explained as shared cost for upkeep of the grounds, periodic updates to infrastructure, or maybe a future upgrades. No matter what its called, ITS A CHARGE YOU SHOULD NOT HAVE TO PAY. Your rent covers those normal expenses. Often, its a technique to get you to more quickly commit and an extra-large commission that goes directly to the salesperson or executive director.
LEVEL OF CARE: WATCH FOR EXCESSIVE CHARGES
Care expenses ARE normal charges that are added to your
monthly fees and ARE typical in senior living fees. You or your loved one will be assessed to determine the amount of medical care and personal assistance as well as supplies in your new community. However, you need to ask WHAT ARE THE CHARGES FOR and HOW FREQUENTLY WILL THEY BE RAISED. You deserve to have this transparency and clarity in what you are paying for and be on-guard for hid-den charges.
MONTHLY LIVING EXPENSE: WHATS INCLUDED
As with the other cost areas, ASK what your monthly living charges cover. Typically, that should be for your living space and upkeep (regular housekeeping.) Ask if your meals, transportation, outings to events, activities, trips to the doctor and meals for visitors are covered in your living expenses. Reputable, well-run senior living facilities will share this information in an honest, direct and transparent manner.
Editors Note: Article submitted by Christine Maretta, Welcoming Director at the Radcliff. Please contact Christine at 630-524-8602 for more information or to schedule a tour.

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