Socialization is the Best Medicine

Posted on

Nov 28, 2022

There is just something about being around people you really like and love. Having good friends around who listen and lift you up on a daily basis. And modern science concurs that good company is good for your mental, emotional, and physical health. It’s one big reason why socialization for seniors is so important and why senior living communities thrive on it.

Socialization for Seniors - Together is better!

The pandemic has reminded us all that isolation is the bad guy, especially when it comes to seniors. In a study by the National Academy of Sciences, lonely and isolated seniors showed higher rates of poor physical and mental health. They were more likely to suffer from hypertension, coronary heart disease, cardiac failure, depression, anxiety, and dementia.    

There are so many benefits of socialization for seniors:

Plenty of activities and socialization reduces cognitive decline. The Alzheimer’s Association reports that remaining socially active may support brain health and possibly delay the onset of dementia. One study found that cognitive abilities in seniors declined about 70 percent slower in individuals who had frequent social connections and socialization   compared to those who had little social contact with others. A quality senior living community offers the perfect environment for making connections, sharing ideas, and creating a purposeful, interactive experience that helps keep you engaged and living your best life. The right recipe for creating socialization for seniors.

Lowers stress. Ongoing stress can lead to heart disease, depression, obesity, gastrointestinal problems and other unwanted conditions. Socialization increases a hormone that decreases anxiety levels and makes us feel more confident in our ability to cope with stressors. This same hormone encourages us to seek out others and helps bring us closer together. At New Perspective, someone is always close by for conversation and support. This is especially beneficial when older adults often experience loss and changes in health and mobility.     

Keeps you active. Socialization for seniors, especially in a senior living community, can be in the form of opportunities to join others for activities and events. Examples are a walking club. Helping other residents decorate a commons area for the holidays. A Zumba class. Getting together to watch a big game. Learning a new hobby together. Being with others stimulates you to move more physically, which is good for your health and helps protect you from a sedentary lifestyle.  

Encourages healthy habits. When you’re living at home, it’s a lot easier to have that second piece of pie or skip walking around the block. That’s why socialization for seniors is so good for you…living in a senior living community, you’re around a group of like-minded friends and neighbors who can help keep you on the path to wellness. You’re more inclined to join an exercise class, participate in special events, or focus on good nutrition because you’re seeing others do just that.

Gives you a sense of purpose. Having a reason to get up each morning does wonders for your energy level and your mood. Your “feel-good” hormones rise and fight off stress when you know you’re going to be greeted by friendly faces and spend quality time with friends. There’s even evidence that having this sense of purpose can help you walk faster and have a firmer grip and greater body balance and control—indicators of how fast you are aging. 

Improves coping skills. Life has its ups and downs. And, as Bette Davis once said, “Getting old isn’t for sissies.” A few more wrinkles and a bit less hair, some new creaks in the knee joints and other challenges are a whole lot easier to deal with—and laugh at—when you can share them over lunch with a friend. Socialization for seniors, particularly in a senior living community gives you ample opportunities to leave worries behind and make the most of what life has to offer.

George Smith
The Right Senior Living Solution
(941) 705-0293


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