The Proposition for the Second Half of Our Lives

Posted on

Aug 25, 2016

Share This
Today YOU are YOU. That is truer then true. There is no one alive, who is YOUER then YOU.
Dr. Seuss, the wisest person ever, gave us permission to take care of us. It is vital to ensure YOU are ok and your life is going in the direction YOU want it to be going in.

According to Erik Ericson, a developmental psychologist known for his theory on psychosocial development of human beings, his 7th stage of development encompasses; Generativity versus Stagnation. This translates into; did you live a life of giving back? As you move from the world of work, where you were a producer, are you moving into a successful second half of your life?

How will you know if you are successful? Ask your self these questions: Did I help the next generation prepare for their future? Am I making a difference in someone elses life? Am I a mentor to others? Am I teaching others to age well?

Setting priorities for your second half of life is paramount. Are you living by YOUR beliefs and values? Can you list activities that matter to YOU? Are you following YOUR passion(s)? This is the time to pursue YOUR dreams.

Development and growth takes place throughout our entire life. Those who are in their late 90s and early 100s will tell you they are still learning new things every day. They honor and celebrate what each day brings to them. We could benefit greatly from following their passion and zest for continued living.

In order to ensure success in the second half of life; you need to feel content and satisfied with what YOU have, what YOU have achieved, what YOUR future looks like, and how YOU are learning and growing.

Regrets are the most frequently mentioned emotion after love. Dont let regrets paralyze you. Use them to live a life that is meaningful to YOU. Have the courage to express YOUR feelings. Allow YOURSELF to be happier. Always stay in touch with old friends.

As Dr. Seuss says, Dont cry because it is over. Smile because it happened.

Editors Note: This article was submitted by Yvonne Myers and is the Health Systems Director at Columbine Health Systems. She can be reached at 970-482-0198 or yvonne.myers@columbinehealth.com

Other Articles You May Like

What to Do When a Loved One Refuses to Recognize Health Concerns

What to Do When a Loved One Refuses to Recognize Health ConcernsProviding care for a family member as they age or face health challenges is an act of kindness that can bring you closer together, but what if your loved one doesnt share your concerns about their health? Recognizing health concerns is the first step toward finding the right support, but denial can be a formidable obstacle. Community Senior Lifes senior living communities in Alabama are dedicated to creating a safe and empowering environment for residents. We tailor our services to meet each individuals unique lifestyle, preferences, and needs, and were sharing some valuable insights into what to do when your family member refuses to acknowledge health concerns.Recognizing Health ConcernsThe health and well-being of our family members are often at the forefront of our minds. However, when those we care about refuse to acknowledge health concerns, it can become a source of tension and constant worry.Understanding the root of this denial and developing a strategy to address it is essential not just for their health but also for maintaining a trusting relationship.There could be numerous reasons why someone might refuse to acknowledge health concerns. Fear of a potential diagnosis, the perceived stigma associated with illness, or simply the reluctance to face the reality of aging can prompt denial. There are also many emotional factors that can come into play in these situations as well, such as pride, fear of losing independence, or a desire not to cause worry among family members.Approaching the IssueWhen initiating this difficult conversation, its critical to approach your family member with empathy and actively listen to their perspective. Choose a time and place where you can communicate honestly, calmly, and without any distractions. Its essential to voice your concerns without casting judgment or assigning blame, as this can often deepen their resistance. Reassurance is key, and by telling your loved one that you want to help them rather than make them feel bad, you can create a sense of support. Here are some ways you can express these feelings: I want you to enjoy the best quality of life that you can; you deserve it! I understand that you want to remain independent. Can we talk more about how senior living can help you do that? You mean so much to me, and I would love to have the opportunity to help you. Seeking a Support SystemA united front can also be very effective when discussing the situation, and including other family members can help ensure everyone delivers the same message of concern and support. Sometimes, the authority of a professional can make all the difference when encouraging your loved one to visit a healthcare provider. It can help alleviate their apprehensions and provide them with the guidance they need to seek a proper assessment and get advice. If they remain resistant, including a therapist or counselors unbiased and professional opinion in these discussions could be beneficial.Aside from therapy or counseling, you can also turn to your family members close friends, neighbors, or even a community figure that your loved one trusts. This will strengthen the support system surrounding your loved one and help emphasize just how important they are to the people around them. Taking Care of YourselfWhile caring for others, dont forget to take care of yourself. Managing your emotions and stress is vital for your health, so contact your close friends, discover support groups, or even consult professional support for your emotional well-being. Additionally, be sure to get quality sleep and plenty of exercise to maintain your physical health.Facing a family member who denies their health issues is a daunting task, but its a challenge that requires persistence, patience, and, most importantly, love. Your support and understanding can make all the difference in helping them recognize the need for care.Remember, youre not alone in this journey, and with the right approach, your family member can get the help they need to live a healthier and fuller life.Community Senior Life understands that recognizing health concerns is only the starting point, and were here to remind you that with time, your efforts can lead to better health and quality of life for those you cherish most. Our senior living communities in Alabama aim to provide the comfort and peace of mind that families need when their loved one is facing difficult times.  Contact our senior living team at 251-981-0200 in Alabama today to learn more!

13 Ways to Celebrate Health, Fitness and Local Parks this Summer

Summer is here and its time for the whole family to get moving!Every year, the National Recreation and Park Association (NRPA) celebrates Family Health & Fitness Day the second Saturday in June (this year its June 8). The goal is to encourage families to make the most of their local park and rec facilities. For many people, thats pretty convenient: 74% of people who live in the U.S. are walking distance from a park, playground, recreation center or open space. Which is great news, because research shows that children and adults who live near parks and spend time in nature actually tend to be healthier mentally and physically.This month, in honor of Family Health & Fitness Day, think about the green spaces that are close to you, and dream up some ways to bring the great outdoors into your familys summer routine. Here are some ideas for fun family adventures all season long.Take a family walk to your local park. Grab your walking shoes and leave the car behind! Wave to the neighbors as you amble over to your favorite open space. Isnt it nice to get away from technology and screens and breathe in some fresh air with the family? You could even consider making this a part of your regular evening routine.Keep your park clean. Grab a trash bag and some gloves and pick up any trash you encounter at the park, playground or recreation facility. Make it beautiful so you and others can enjoy the serenity of nature, without being distracted by litter. Bonus: picking up trash can be a good workout!Sign up for a 5k (or plan your own). See if your local park hosts a walk or run, and if they dont, study a map and do it yourself! Make it a fun group activity by inviting friends and neighbors to join.  Plan a barbecue or picnic at the park. Stock up on your favorite foods and enjoy them al fresco at your areas green space. Take a ball or flying disc to toss around and make a day of it. Just be sure to load up on sunblock and find some shade, so you dont get a sunburn!Have fun. Play tag or chase; slide down slides; swing on swings; spin on the merry-go-round; flop in the grass; dance in the fountain; play fetch with the dog. Do whatever activity calls to you at your local park, whether youre a kid, or a kid at heart!Go swimming. Find your nearest pool, whether its at a park, a community center or somewhere elseand take the plunge! Swimming is one of summers greatest perks, and it also happens to be excellent exercise. Pack a pool bag with snacks, a book and plenty of sunblock and make a day of it.Pose for a photo shoot. Green spaces make beautiful backdrops. Gather some friends and tell them to bring some fun fashion and props and strike a pose.Sign up for a fitness class. Lots of parks have gyms and offer indoor and outdoor group fitness classes. This could be your summer to finally try yoga or Zumba! Or, maybe its time to try your hand at pickleball, or join a volleyball team. All of the above are a great way to get moving, and maybe even meet some of your neighbors.  Go on a treasure hunt. Wander around the paths and trails of a regional park and see what you can spot. Maybe youll find a four-leaf clover, observe some weird insect behavior or encounter other creatures. Tune into the flora and the fauna and see where your walk takes you.Visit a local farm or farmers market. Buying fruits and vegetables grown nearby is great for your health and the environment. When you shop whats in season, you might even get inspired to try some new recipes. See if your local park hosts a farmers market or head to a nearby farm. Take the kids along and let them choose fruits and veggies they want to try. Take it a step further and challenge them to help you come up with the menu for the week.Take a deep breath. Green spaces have a way of helping you relax, instantly. At a park, you can sit, rest, think and simply be, with no expectations or obligations. Grab a journal and some headphones, or just sit on a bench and watch the world around you. You may find that you leave feeling a little bit lighter than when you arrived.Spend a night camping. Whens the last time you went camping? Summer can be a lovely time to spend a night under the stars. Do a little research and find a campground near your house. Or, keep it low-key and pitch a tent in the backyard. It involves less packing and planning and easy bathroom and air-conditioner access. Bring more green spaces and green practices into your life. Consider what changes you could make at your home to boost your own healthy practices and activities. For example, kick off a regular family exercise routineyou dont need any equipment for sit-ups, push-ups, crunches and other strength-building activities. Plant a garden and grow your own fruits, vegetables and herbs, either in containers, in the ground or in a community garden. Challenge other family members to a walking competition and see who can squeeze in more steps every week. What other endeavors can you think of that would make health and fitness a part of your familys everyday routine?  Family health and fitness gets the spotlight in June, but its a concept you can commit to year-round. This summer, strive to incorporate some fun, healthy habits into the mix. Eating nutritious foods and adding more activity to your routine can benefit you and your whole family. And your local park is a great place to start!This article was contributed by Blue Cross Blue Shield of Alabama.  Contact them concerning Medicare Advantage and Insurance Plans at 251-210-7089.

Persuading Aging Parents to Get Help: 4 Strategies for Peace of Mind

Persuading Aging Parents to Get Help: 4 Strategies for Peace of MindPersuading an aging parent to ask for occasional help can be challenging. With some planning and understanding, you can come up with a game plan to persuade a strong-willed parent to welcome a landing hand every now and again. Read the 4 Strategies to Convince an Older Parent to Consider Getting Help below.Strategy 1: Identify Every Single Service Where Your Aging Parent Could Use HelpSmall Actions Can Add Up Start with your ideal scenario in mind. If you had a magic wand, what would you want help with right now? Maybe its some light cooking every now and again, or maybe its organizing and sorting leftover mail. Whatever it might be, come up with a full list and identify all of the existing services where its completely acceptable to hire a service. For example, requesting help with a ride or an occasional meal is totally normal, even desirable, with Uber and Doordash. If a parent is comfortable requesting Doordash, maybe theyll be open to a person coming in to help around the house just as easily. If your parent takes rides on Uber, maybe it wont be so far off to welcome assistance with a grocery delivery.Strategy 2: Understand the Source of Your Elderly Parents Reaction to Getting HelpTackle the Root Cause FirstOften, a refusal for help isnt about the action itself but something much bigger. The exact cause would depend on the individual aging parent, but some reasons could relate to a potential change in identity, perception, and social values. In situations like these, its helpful to insert your parent directly into the conversation. There are many ways to get at a root cause, but here are some starters:Ask your parent to describe themselves in 5 words Ask your parent to draw themselves on their ideal day Ask your parent to say whats their favorite thing they love about themselves Ask your parent to say what they think family members think about them Strategy 3: Reframe Asking for Help into a Concept that Matches Fit a Parents Core BeliefIts All about PerceptionNow that you have some insight into who your older parent really wants to be, you can develop a simple communication strategy that changes the way they view asking for help. For example, your parent might be very comfortable being served a meal at a restaurant, but they might cringe at the thought of someone coming in their home to cook. What if having someone come in at home is thought of as a convenient service rather than an ask for help? What if someone coming in to cook at home is reframed as a way to save time to spend with grandchildren instead? These are some ways you can flip the script away from someone needing help to someone choosing to get help so they can have more time doing the things they love. After all, anyone, at any stage, can use a little help. Strategy 4: Reach Out to Friends or Family Members Who Have Used Similar ServicesSocial Proof Can Make a DifferenceSometimes, all it takes is a nudge from our social circle to feel comfortable with a decision. How many times have you been wary of trying something, only to find yourself being persuaded by a close friend? Our parents might think the same way. Can you think of anyone in your older parents community who has previously used a helping hand? Consider asking them to have a casual conversation with your parents and briefly mentioning their experience. The more people talk about a certain topic, the more persuasive it is. Thats the power of social networks. Its never easy to convince a parent that its time to ask for help. After all, a parent has spent a quarter of a lifetime (or more!) caring for their children, that it can be hard to change their perspective of caregiving. With the 5 strategies on persuading an aging parent to ask for help, we hope that you can open up the conversation with an aging parent to view asking for help as a way to a flourishing, vibrant future rather than a sign of weakness or helplessness. Getting help frees up time, and is there anything more important than extra time to do what we love?