Top Reasons Why Seniors Delay Moving to Senior Living

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WeCare Senior Relocation Services, LLC

For more information about the author, click to view their website: WeCare Senior Relocation Services

Posted on

Dec 12, 2023

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Florida - Sarasota, Bradenton & Charlotte Counties

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Most senior citizens have an unexplainable emotional attachment to their homes. It might be difficult for someone young to understand how it feels to leave behind a place where one has spent twenty to forty years. However, with children moving out and aging catching up, it can be difficult for senior citizens to continue living there. Yet they often delay moving to a senior living facility.

Here are some of the reasons why.

Emotional Attachment

Seniors are deeply attached to the place they have lived for a long time. They have evolved into who they are in their homes and have become a part of them.
This house is where they achieved significant milestones in their lives and are often not ready to come out of their comfort zone. Thus, keep deferring their shifting plans.

Moving Can Be Overwhelming

Moving to a new place can be stressful and overwhelming for anyone, but even more so for seniors. The principal cause of worry is the move itself, which involves packing and arranging their things the way they want at a senior living facility.

Furthermore, they are concerned about giving up some habits they feel they cannot live without.

Letting Go

Moving means giving up things they no longer require. It can be anything like favorite furniture, old and frayed rugs, china sets received at the wedding, and much more. As a result, senior citizens often put off moving into senior living rather than going through this process.

Getting Used to the Community

Above all, seniors fear not being able to fit into the new community. Although senior living accommodations have all the arrangements necessary for easy settling in, the seniors often fear they won’t be able to mingle with the other members of the community.
Moreover, some seniors feel they are not old enough to move to senior living, while others think they are too old and do not want to come across as weak in front of strangers. There is also the concern that the lifestyle change might not be financially feasible. Overall, there is a psychological impact that moving entails, and that makes the seniors delay their move.

At WeCare Senior Relocation Services, LLC, we specialize in providing seniors with all the assistance required for moving into senior living. We help them go through their belongings, sort them out, and choose which items they want to retain and which they wish to donate or give away. We also help them with more significant tasks like packing their furniture and unpacking their belongings when they reach their senior living accommodations.

Most importantly, we provide them with all the emotional support they need during this crucial transition phase, helping them progress to this new stage in life. If you want to move to senior living or have a senior family member who needs assistance with moving, then we are the ones for you.

Give us a call, and you can trust us to help you or your loved ones with the utmost respect and compassion.

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Local Services By This Author

WeCare Senior Relocation Services, LLC

Move Management & Organizing Services 870 South McCall Road Ste. 6, Englewood, Florida, 34223

Making a move at any age can be difficult and stressful. After 30, 40, or even 50 years in your current home, the process of rightsizing and relocating to a new home is overwhelming. WeCare Senior Relocation Services offers assistance in relocating seniors to Independent Living, Assisted Living, and internal moves within a senior living community. Our team of Senior Move Managers can help you or your family members decide what to take with them to their new home to ensure their safety, assist with creating a floor plan,  determine what you should donate or gift to friends and relatives, packing, unpacking, as well as the physical move. Our main goal is to curate your new home so you or your loved one can quickly settle in and start enjoying life's next chapter. Allow us to alleviate your stress and anxiety by carrying the burden of coordinating your move so that you can feel relief and joy going into the upcoming move. So remember, "WeCare about your move, so you don't have to!"