What is Dementia? Symptoms, Types and Diagnosis

Author

Center at Rock Creek, The

Posted on

Jun 25, 2021

Book/Edition

Colorado - Northern Colorado

Share This
Dementia is the loss of cognitive functioning thinking, remembering, and reasoning and behavior alabilities to such an extent that it interferes with a persons daily life and activities. These functions include memory, language skills, visual perception, problem solving, self-management, and the ability to focus and pay attention. Some people with dementia cannot control their emotions, and their personalities may change. Dementia ranges in severity from the mildest stage, when it is just beginning to affect a persons functioning, to the most severe stage, when the person must depend completely on others for basic activities of living.

Other Articles You May Like

Encouraging Volunteerism in Senior Care

Volunteerism is not just about giving time. Volunteering in senior care is about igniting a spark a spark of connection, joy, and purpose that enriches lives on both sides of the giving equation. Learn how you can ditch the ordinary and become an extraordinary force for good in the lives of seniors. This guide discusses the benefits of volunteerism for seniors and ways caregivers can help them get involved in community service.Benefits of Volunteerism for SeniorsVolunteering can greatly boost a senior's self-esteem. It gives them a sense of purpose and accomplishment. When they see the positive impact they're making, it can lift their spirits and improve their mental health. Feeling needed and valued can be incredibly empowering.Social connections are vital for everyone, and seniors are no exception. Volunteering offers a chance to meet new people and build friendships. This helps reduce feelings of isolation and loneliness, which are common among seniors. A vibrant social life can lead to increased happiness and emotional well-being.Physical Health BenefitsStaying active and engaged through volunteer work can also benefit physical health. Movement is necessary for maintaining health, whether it's light physical activity or simply getting out of the house. Some studies even suggest that active seniors are likely to have better overall physical health.From walks around the park with fellow volunteers to light cleaning and tidying up around a community organization, there are a wealth of ways to keep seniors active while doing good for those around them. Still, seniors should always speak to their healthcare providers before starting a new fitness routine.How Caregivers Can Support Senior VolunteerismAs a caregiver, you can help seniors find the right volunteer opportunities. Match these opportunities with the senior's interests and skills. Consider what they enjoy and what they're good at. Equally important is considering their physical and cognitive abilities to ensure the volunteer work is suitable and fulfilling.One of the main barriers to volunteering is often transportation. Caregivers can arrange transportation to volunteer sites. This includes coordinating schedules and ensuring the seniors can get where they need to be. Providing logistical support, like helping with sign-ups and schedules, can make a big difference.Caregivers should offer positive reinforcement and celebrate the senior's contributions. Sometimes, seniors may have concerns or fears about starting something new. Addressing these concerns and providing the support they need can motivate them to take the first step.Get Custom Care and Support Services for Seniors TodayThe benefits of senior volunteerism are numerous, from boosting self-esteem to promoting social connections and improving physical health. Caregivers can help by identifying suitable opportunities, providing transportation, and offering encouragement. Let's strive to support our seniors in giving back to the community.If you need assistance in finding and supporting volunteer opportunities for seniors in Fort Collins, Englewood, Littleton, Windsor, and Longmont, contact us at Senior Helpers Fort Collins. We proudly provide compassionate senior care services that serve the whole person and enhance emotional and physical health.

Caring for a Loved One with Memory Loss

Memory loss, whether due to Alzheimers disease or other forms of dementia, can profoundly impact the lives of both the affected individual and their loved ones. The journey of caring for someone with memory loss is filled with challenges, but it can also be a deeply rewarding experience. As caregivers, we strive to provide the best care and support for our loved ones, ensuring their safety, dignity and quality of life. But as dementia progresses, it can bring about significant changes in behavior, memory and overall well-being, leaving family caregivers seeking the best memory care services. While providing care at home may seem like the most natural choice, there comes a point where considering a memory care community, like Anthology Senior Living, becomes a compelling option. In this blog, well explore the complexities of caring for a loved one with memory loss and delve into the reasons why an Anthology community can be the best solution. Understanding the Challenges of Caring for Seniors with Memory LossMemory loss is a complex condition that requires deep understanding of the underlying causes and its progression. Whether its mild cognitive impairment or advanced dementia, knowing how to manage symptoms and creating an environment that promotes mental stimulation and emotional well-being are crucial. Family caregivers often find themselves navigating through various challenges, such as:Increased care demands: As the disease progresses, individuals often require 24/7 supervision and specialized care, making it difficult for family caregivers to balance their personal and professional lives.Safety concerns: Memory loss, such as dementia, can lead to wandering, confusion and forgetfulness, putting the person at risk of accidents or getting lost if not properly supervised.Emotional toll: Providing care for a loved one with memory loss can lead to emotional strain, stress and burnout for family caregivers who may feel isolated or unsupported.Specialized care needs: Memory care requires specialized knowledge and training, which family caregivers may not possess. The Importance of Specialized Memory CareCaring for a loved one with memory loss goes beyond mere assistance with daily tasks. Specialized memory care programs are designed to provide a safe and supportive environment for residents. Anthology has memory care communities, like Anthology of Meridian Hills, that are equipped with safety features and memory-enhancing elements to foster a sense of familiarity and reduce anxiety. These communities are thoughtfully designed to create a homelike setting, promoting engagement and socialization among residents. Person-Centered Approach Embracing a person-centered approach is a crucial aspect of memory care. At Anthology, every resident is treated as a unique individual with their own life story, preferences and needs. Care plans are made with input from residents and their loved ones, focusing on independence, dignity and memory loss challenges. This approach fosters a sense of empowerment, ultimately enhancing the overall well-being and happiness of the residents. Compassionate and Trained Staff Caring for individuals with memory loss requires a special set of skills and patience. Every member of our memory care team receives rigorous, specialized training in dementia care, plus additional mandatory training each year. Our advanced methods use the newest smart technology and electronic health records, involving you in their care journey. Our teams are adept at managing behavioral changes and communication difficulties and providing emotional support to both residents and their families. Engaging Activities and Programs Memory loss can sometimes lead to isolation and withdrawal, making social interaction and mental stimulation vital components of care. Anthology communities are built around six dimensions of wellness physical, emotional, social, intellectual, spiritual and environmental that promote independence. These are especially important in the care we provide to our memory care residents.Daily programming is built around each resident, offering flexible schedules and activities designed to instill meaning, assurance and purpose. Exercise and social activities help your loved one stay active and empowered to enjoy each day. Our communities use Fit Minds cognitive programs to help residents increase their self-confidence, social engagement and mental acuity. We also offer iN2L programming, a computer software that includes interactive multimedia and cognitive-based games and adaptive devices that keep seniors active, connected and engaged. iN2L addresses the need for individualized, accessible engagement that enhances cognitive function, socialization and quality of life. Nurturing Neighborhoods Our Virtue Memory Care Neighborhoods, like the one at Anthology of The Plaza, are designed to help your loved one thrive in mind, body and spirit. Curated artwork features local landmarks and nostalgic images to evoke feelings of home. Memory displays outside each personal suite feature personal photos and mementos to provide familiarity. Even the dining experience is designed for familiarity by featuring favorite foods served with an appealing flair. Here to Support You No one should experience dementia alone. Discover the compassion and partnership of one of our memory care communities. Dedicated, certified caregivers provide your loved one with the comprehensive care they need and the vibrant life they deserve in a secure and engaging environment.Let us be a trusted and reliable source; we are here to help. Contact us today. Our experts are ready to answer any questions you have. Anthology has 30 memory care communities nationwide offering memory care services for those with dementia or memory loss. From Kansas City, Missouri to Henrico, Virginia and locations all over the country, find a community near you today.

What to Do When Senior Parents Don't Recognize You

Caring for a loved one with Alzheimer's or dementia is a journey filled with emotional highs and lows. One of the most challenging moments for adult children serving as primary caregivers is when their parents are unable to recognize them. This can be a heartbreaking and distressing experience, and understanding how to respond and how to care for your own emotional health is crucial. Alzheimer's and DementiaAlzheimer's and dementia are complex neurological disorders primarily characterized by memory loss and cognitive decline. Recognizing their nature is fundamental to coping with the impact. These conditions mess up the brain's wiring, interfering not only with memory but also recognition, making familiar faces seem alien to your loved ones. While it is distressing, remember it is the disease, not your parent, causing this heartbreaking moment of non-recognition.Coping With the Moment of Non-recognition When a loved one fails to recognize you, it can be a shocking and emotional moment. It's important to handle it with grace and sensitivity. Stay calm; your reaction can influence your parent's response. Arguing or correcting them may only cause confusion or distress. Patiently reassure them with your presence, emitting love and care. Remind yourself not to take their non-recognition personally; it is the disease at the helm, not their choice.Focusing on Self-Care as a CaregiverAs you navigate these challenging times, taking care of your emotional health is paramount. The adage 'you can't pour from an empty cup' rings true in your role as a caregiver. Regular breaks from caregiving duties will allow you to recharge and can be beneficial for your stress levels. Engaging in hobbies or activities that you enjoy can provide a much-needed distraction and a source of joy. Don't hesitate to seek counseling or support groups; sharing your experiences with those who understand can lighten your emotional load.Navigating the Long-Term Emotional ImpactRepeated instances of non-recognition can indeed lead to continuous emotional distress. It's a stark reminder of the progressive nature of the disease and can challenge your emotional resilience.Focus on the Good TimeDuring these times, focus on the moments of connection and understanding that you still share with your parent. Gently remind yourself that your relationship extends beyond recognition; it's rooted in a lifetime of shared memories and experiences. MournIt's okay to mourn the loss of what once was, but don't let that eclipse the love that remains. If you find yourself struggling to cope, it's crucial to seek professional help. Therapists or counselors specialized in caregiver stress can provide tools to manage your emotions better.Forgive YourselfEmbrace self-forgiveness. You're doing the best you can, and you should cut yourself some slack. Know that it's okay to have moments of frustration or sadness. Resilience is not about never faltering; it is about getting back up every time you stumble.Loving Care for Seniors With Alzheimer's or DementiaThe journey of caregiving for a parent with Alzheimer's or dementia is challenging, and the emotional impact when they fail to recognize you can be overwhelming. Understanding the nature of their condition, managing your reaction, and emphasizing self-care are all crucial to navigating these difficult moments. If you live in Fort Collins, Loveland, Greeley, Wellington, or Longmont, Senior Helpers Greeley is here to support you. We offer various services to assist and provide resources to make this journey manageable. Contact us today by calling 970-373-3858.

Local Services By This Author

Center at Rock Creek, The

Skilled Nursing 4880 Ziegler Road, Fort Collins, Colorado, 80528

Center at Rock Creek, The

Rehabilitation Facilities 4880 Zeigler Road, Fort Collins, Colorado, 80528

This free listing made possible by Seniors BlueBook

Center at Rock Creek Assisted Living, The

Assisted Living 4880 Zeigler Road, Fort Collins, Colorado, 80528