When is Overnight Care Needed For Seniors?

Author

Assisting Hands of Preston Hollow

Posted on

Jul 21, 2022

Book/Edition

Texas - Dallas, Collin, SE Denton & Rockwall Counties

Share This

WHEN IS OVERNIGHT CARE NEEDED FOR SENIORS?

 

Overnight care becomes very important for seniors and their families when comprehensive care is needed. Many seniors require help with daily activities such as bathing, eating, and grocery shopping. However, a greater benefit is seen with seniors who suffer from progressive conditions such as Alzheimer’s disease and other forms of dementia.

 

What is Overnight Care & Who Can Benefit

Overnight care is when a caregiver provides care through the night. For example, they help with using the restroom at night, provide fluids and snacks, and assists the senior with getting ready for bed. Some seniors receive help with transfer assistance and changing positions in bed throughout the night. Overnight caregivers also prepare breakfast and offer morning care such as personal hygiene and home care.

Overnight care is best for those seniors who have trouble sleeping at night or who wander due to dementia. Having a caregiver available at night gives them assurance, relieves anxiety and disorientation due to disrupted sleep.

 

Benefits of Overnight Care

Overnight care gives peace of mind to your family, as you can rest assured that a highly qualified individual is providing constant care to their loved one.

 

NIGHTTIME SUPERVISION

 

Many seniors can wander at night due to dementia or similar conditions as they tend to experience disrupted sleep and disorientation. Frequent wakefulness that leads to wandering at night and can be dangerous. Not only can the senior be at risk for falling, but in general, seniors with these conditions should not be alone at night. An overnight caregiver can monitor them and help as needed.

 

MEDICAL CARE

 

In the case that a senior has epilepsy or other medical conditions and needs constant supervision, an overnight caregiver who is qualified for the specific type of care needed can help them deal with any medical condition if it gets worse. Family members can rest assured that their loved one is getting the best care possible in the case that their condition flairs up, or they face an emergency.

 

MOBILITY ASSISTANCE

 

Many seniors can wander at night due to dementia or similar cIf the senor must use the restroom at night, the overnight caregiver can help. This way the senior can get to the restroom safely with the help of the caregiver.

 

ERATIC BEHAVIOR

 

Dementia can cause a change in personality and emotional outbursts. Leaving a senior with dementia at home at night can be dangerous, so having an overnight caregiver can help prevent the seniors with these conditions from facing dangerous situations.

 

MEDICATION SCHEDULES

 

Forgetting to take medications is common behavior for the elderly, especially if they are alone. Some medications such as the ones for blood pressure, must be taken regularly to avoid bad consequences. An overnight caregiver can remind the senior to take the medication before bed.

 

FORGETFULNESS

 

For those seniors that are extremely forgetful, it can be very beneficial to have an overnight caregiver. Seniors who are forgetful can leave the stove on and even leave their doors open. A highly qualified overnight caregiver can monitor their environment and help keep them safe.

 

DEPRESSION

 

As seniors get older, they can have depressive thoughts. An overnight caregiver can help support them emotionally and provide companionship to help prevent them from harming themselves while they are in a depressed state.

 

Article submitted by Robbie McCullough with Assisting Hands Home Care | www.assistinghands.com/38/texas/prestonhollow/

Other Articles You May Like

Aducanumab and Lecanemab: How are they different?

Aducanumab and Lecanemab: How are they different?Aducanumab and Lecanemab are both medications for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease. Aducanumab is a monoclonal antibody that targets beta-amyloid, a protein that accumulates in the brain and is associated with the development of Alzheimer's. Lecanemab is also a monoclonal antibody but it targets a different structure of beta-amyloid, called N3pG, which is believed to play a key role in the formation of amyloid plaques in the brain.The main difference between Aducanumab and Lecanemab is their mechanism of action. Aducanumab works by removing beta-amyloid from the brain, while Lecanemab works by blocking the formation of amyloid plaques in the brain.In clinical trials, Lecanemab has been shown to remove amyloid more quickly than Aducanumab or another medication called gantenerumab. Lecanemab has also shown a lower incidence of a side effect called ARIA (amyloid-related imaging abnormalities) compared to Aducanumab in clinical trials.It is important to note that both medications are still under investigation and more research is needed to fully understand their benefits and limitations. The choice of medication will ultimately depend on a patient's specific needs and circumstances, and should be made in consultation with a healthcare provider.Additionally, Aducanumab is approved for use in some countries, including the U.S., but is still awaiting approval in others. Lecanemab as of January 6th, 2023, has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) through the Accelerated Approval pathway.Both Aducanumab and Lecanemab are part of a growing body of research into new treatments for Alzheimer's disease, which remains one of the most challenging and devastating neurological conditions. There are currently limited treatment options for Alzheimer's, and the development of new and effective therapies is a major priority for researchers and clinicians.While both medications show promise in their ability to target beta-amyloid, it is important to remember that treating Alzheimer's is a complex process that involves addressing multiple factors, including genetics, lifestyle, and environment.In conclusion, the differences between Aducanumab and Lecanemab lie in their mechanism of action and stage of development. Further research is needed to determine the long-term safety and efficacy of these medications in the treatment of Alzheimer's disease. As with any medical treatment, it is important to consult with a healthcare provider to determine the best course of action for an individual patient.Author:  Kathleen Warshawsky, RN, BSN | Publisher Seniors Blue BookOther articles you may like:Aducanumab and Lecanemab: How are they different?The Success of Lecanumab (Leqembi) in Treating Alzheimer's DiseaseThe Success of Aducanumab in Treating Alzheimer's Disease

The Success of Lecanumab (Leqembi) in Treating Alzheimer's Disease

The Success of Lecanumab (Leqembi) in Treating Alzheimer's DiseaseAlzheimer's disease is a debilitating and progressive brain disorder that affects more than 6.5 million Americans. It slowly erodes memory and thinking skills, and eventually the ability to carry out simple tasks. Despite the efforts of researchers and scientists, the specific causes of Alzheimer's disease are still not fully known. However, the disease is characterized by changes in the brain such as amyloid beta plaques and neurofibrillary tangles that result in the loss of neurons and their connections. These changes impact a person's ability to remember and think, leading to a decline in cognitive function.Leqembi, also known as lecanemab-irmb, is a new treatment for Alzheimer's disease that as of January 6th, 2023, has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) through the Accelerated Approval pathway. This new treatment represents an important advancement in the ongoing battle against Alzheimer's disease, as it targets the fundamental pathophysiology of the disease, rather than merely treating its symptoms.Leqembi's efficacy was evaluated in a double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group, dose-finding study of 856 patients with Alzheimer's disease. The study showed that patients receiving the approved dose of Leqembi (10 milligrams/kilogram every two weeks) had a statistically significant reduction in brain amyloid plaque compared to the placebo arm. The amyloid beta plaque was quantified using positron emission tomography (PET) imaging, and was estimated in a composite of brain regions that are expected to be widely affected by Alzheimer's disease pathology.The results of this study support the accelerated approval of Leqembi, which is based on the observed reduction of amyloid beta plaque, a marker of Alzheimer's disease. The prescribing information for Leqembi includes a warning for amyloid-related imaging abnormalities (ARIA) and a risk of infusion-related reactions. However, the most common side effects of Leqembi were infusion-related reactions, headache, and ARIA.The FDA granted Leqembi Fast Track, Priority Review, and Breakthrough Therapy designations, highlighting the significance of this new treatment for Alzheimer's disease. Leqembi's approval marks a major milestone in the fight against Alzheimer's disease, providing hope for patients and their families who have been affected by this devastating condition.Leqembi has been proven to be an effective treatment for Alzheimer's disease, offering a new hope for patients and their families. The results of the clinical trial demonstrate a significant reduction in brain amyloid plaque, a hallmark of Alzheimer's disease, and provide a strong foundation for further research and development in this field.References:      U.S. Food and Drug Administration. (2023, January 6). FDA Grants Accelerated Approval for Alzheimers Disease Treatment. [Press Release]. Retrieved from https://www.fda.gov/news-events/press-announcements/fda-grants-accelerated-approval-alzheimers-disease-treatment      Leqembi. (n.d.). Medication Guide. Retrieved from https://www.leqembi.com/-/media/Files/Leqembi/Medication-Guide.pdf?hash=d4e8f584-6cf3-41c4-a7f3-34bda6abb800Author: Kathleen Warshawsky, BSN, RN | Publisher Seniors Blue BookOther articles you may like:Aducanumab and Lecanemab: How are they different?The Success of Lecanumab (Leqembi) in Treating Alzheimer's DiseaseThe Success of Aducanumab in Treating Alzheimer's Disease

The Success of Aducanumab in Treating Alzheimer's Disease

The Success of Aducanumab in Treating Alzheimer's DiseaseAducanumab is a medication that has received a lot of attention in recent years for its potential in treating Alzheimer's disease. Alzheimer's is a progressive neurological disorder that affects memory, thinking, and behavior, and there is currently no cure for the condition. Aducanumab is a type of drug called a monoclonal antibody, which works by targeting and removing sticky deposits of a protein called beta-amyloid that build up in the brains of individuals with Alzheimer's.Aducanumab has shown promising results in treating Alzheimer's disease. It is a monoclonal antibody that targets beta-amyloid, a protein that accumulates in the brain and is associated with the development of Alzheimer's. The drug works by removing beta-amyloid from the brain, slowing the progression of the disease and potentially improving cognitive function.In clinical trials, Aducanumab has been shown to reduce beta-amyloid levels in the brain and slow cognitive decline in patients with early Alzheimer's disease. The results of these trials have been highly promising and have led to the approval of Aducanumab by regulatory agencies in several countries.One of the most significant findings of the clinical trials was the observation of a statistically significant reduction in clinical decline in patients who received Aducanumab. This reduction in decline was observed in measures of cognitive function, such as memory and thinking skills, as well as in measures of daily functioning, such as the ability to perform basic activities of daily living.Another important finding from the trials was the observation of a favorable safety profile for Aducanumab. The majority of patients who received the medication did not experience significant side effects, and those that did were generally mild and manageable.In November 2021, the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) granted accelerated approval for Aducanumab as a treatment for Alzheimer's disease. This decision was based on evidence from clinical trials, as well as on the need for new treatments for Alzheimer's, which is a growing global health crisis. The FDA has required the manufacturer of Aducanumab, Biogen, to conduct additional studies to confirm the drug's benefits and to better understand its risks and side effects.The development of Aducanumab has been the subject of numerous clinical trials, with positive results seen in early trials in reducing beta-amyloid deposits in the brains of individuals with Alzheimer's. It is important to note however, that more recent trials have produced mixed results, with some studies showing a slowing of cognitive decline in individuals taking Aducanumab and others showing little to no effect.Aducanumab is a promising new treatment option for Alzheimer's, although more research is needed to determine its long-term safety and effectiveness. Individuals and their families should discuss with their healthcare provider the potential benefits and risks of taking Aducanumab, as well as other treatment options that may be available.In conclusion, Aducanumab is a medication that has received attention for its potential in treating Alzheimer's disease. The drug works by targeting and removing beta-amyloid deposits in the brain, which is believed to contribute to the progression of the disease. While the results of clinical trials have been mixed, the FDA has granted accelerated approval for Aducanumab as a treatment for Alzheimer's, with additional studies required to confirm its benefits and risks. Individuals and their families should consult with their healthcare provider to determine if Aducanumab is the right treatment option for them.References:      Alzheimer's Association. (2021). Aducanumab.      Biogen. (2021). Aducanumab.      FDA. (2021). Aducanumab Approval Letter.      National Institute on Aging. (2021). Alzheimer's Disease and Dementia. Author: Kathleen Warshawsky, BSN, RN | Publisher Seniors Blue Book Greater Dallas Other articles you may like:Aducanumab and Lecanemab: How are they different?The Success of Lecanumab (Leqembi) in Treating Alzheimer's DiseaseThe Success of Aducanumab in Treating Alzheimer's Disease

Local Services By This Author

Assisting Hands of Preston Hollow

Non-Medical 6600 LBJ Frwy Suite 188, Dallas, Texas, 75240

Assisting Hands Home Care emphasizes exceptional customer service and customized in-home care to their clients. Their vision of providing a better alternative for the elderly, disabled, and others needing assistance at home, has grown over the years to a multi-award winning and highly recognized home care franchise.Their exceptional home care enriches the lives of its clients and provides peace of mind for the families. Its mission is to offer personalized non-medical support services in the clients homes by caring the elderly, disabled, and others needing assistance to maintain quality of life. Assisting Hands has been recognized for setting a standard for providing quality caregivers. The application and interview processes for hiring caregivers are in-depth and include a comprehensive background check and training before providing care in the homes of someones loved one. Their caregivers assist with the day-to-day activities such as senior in-home care, elderly care services, personal care, companion services, coordination of care, and more. They also help the family select the best matched caregiver for their loved one from its pre-screened group of available assistants and can have qualified help placed in the home generally within 48 hours or less of the initial call.