When to Refer a Patient to Hospice

Posted on

Apr 06, 2021

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Health care specialists are sometimes uncertain whether their patient may be eligible for hospice services. VITAS offers several solutions to help clinicians better recognize when a patient has transitioned to this phase of life.
In general, hospice should be considered with any of the following:

When symptoms arise secondary to the diagnosis
When a patients disease continues to progress or when the a patient stops responding to disease-modifying treatments

Additional insights into hospice eligibility can be found on our hospice guidelines, which include general and disease-specific guidance.
In general, look for these signs over the last 4-6 months:

The illness, if it progresses as expected, has a prognosis of six months or less. (Ask yourself: Would I be surprised to learn, six months from now, that this patient has died? If your answer is no, request a hospice evaluation for this patient.)
Patient has a PPS ratingof < 50%-60%
Patient is dependent in any 3 out of 6 ADLs
Patient has lost more than 10% body weight, or another alteration in nutritional status
Patient has had 3 or more hospital/ED visits
Decrease in physical activity
Decrease in cognitive ability

Submitted and Written By: VITAS Healthcare - click here for more information

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