Act F.A.S.T to Prevent Irreversible Damage from Stroke

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Heart Body and Mind Homecare

Posted on

Jun 23, 2021

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Florida - Southwest

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Hundreds of thousands of individuals across America will experience a stroke this year. Still, despite the fact that stroke is the third leading cause of death in America and the number one cause of adult disability, many remain uneducated as to its causes and methods for prevention. Even more alarming is the fact that many individuals fail to recognize a stroke when experiencing symptoms. Heart, Body, & Mind Home Care understands the importance of Stroke Education. We encourage the general public to become more aware about stroke risk factors, methods for prevention and symptom recognition. Heart, Body & Mind Home Care knows that acting F.A.S.T is the key to reducing the side effects of a stroke.
F.A.S.T Thinking
As part of a national public education movement Heart, Body, & Mind Home Care encourages F.A.S.T thinking when you are unsure if a loved one has experienced a stroke.

Face- Ask the person to smile. Does one side of his face droop?
Arms- Ask the person to raise both arms. Does one arm drift downward?
Speech- Ask the person to repeat a simple sentence. Can he repeat the sentence correctly? Are his words slurred? If any of these answers are YES then
Time is of essence! Call 911 right away or get to a hospital as fast as possible!

Quick Facts about Stroke
Symptoms of a stroke include

Sudden numbness or weakness of face, an arm, or a leg especially on one side of the
body.
Confusion or trouble speaking and understanding.
Trouble seeing from one or both eyes.
Trouble walking, dizziness, loss of balance or coordination.
Sudden severe headache with no known cause.

What is a stroke?
A stroke is the result of interrupted blood flow to an area of the brain and can cause brain damage. How a stroke patient is affected depends on where the stroke occurs in the brain and how much the brain is damaged. Some people recover completely from strokes, but more than 2/3 of survivors will have some type of disability. Abilities impacted usually include speech, movement, and memory.
How do you reduce your risk of a stroke?
According to the National Stroke Association (NSA), 80% of strokes are preventable through
careful attention to these ten steps:

Check your blood pressure regularly.
Find out if you have atrial fibrillation (a type of irregular heartbeat).
Stop smoking.
Drink alcohol in moderation.
Know your cholesterol numbers.
Control diabetes.
Exercise.
Eat a lower sodium, lower fat diet.
Find out if you have circulation problems.
Be aware of stroke symptoms.

Life after a stroke
There are ways to make life easier if your abilities are impacted due to stroke.

Dressing can be made easier by selecting clothes with front fasteners and replacing buttons, zippers, and laces with Velcro fasters. There are also several dressing aids available, such as long-handled shoe horns on Internet sites and in health supply stores.
Special utensils such as flatware with built-up handles which are easier to grasp and rocker knives for cutting food with one hand can help people with physically-impaired arms and hands.
Helpful bathroom devices include, among others, grab bars in shower or tub, raised toilet seat, tub bench, electric razor and toothbrush and flip-top toothpaste tube.

Need more information?

Visit www.stroke.org or call 1-800-STROKES (1-800-787-6537).
Subscribe FREE to Stroke Smart magazine at www.stroke.org to view the latest gears
and gadgets.
Join a stroke support group.
Contact Heart, Body & Mind Home Care for information on recovering at home with help.

Heart, Body & Mind Home Care offers care for individuals who have suffered from a stroke as well as advice and guidance for friends and family who serve as caregivers. Despite a loss of certain abilities, those living with a stroke may still remain comfortable within their own home with the proper care and assistance.
We urge the public to become educated about strokes and offer ourselves as a helpful resource for all who wish to learn more about the disease.

Fort Myers Home Health Care
Heart Body & Mind Home Care is committed to the principle that it takes more than just effort to provide care to another human being it takes heart. Our hearts are in all that we do. If you are interested in learning more about our compassionate home care and wellness services in Southwest Florida, click the link above.

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