Living Stress Free

Posted on

Jun 28, 2016

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Stress, you have it, I have it, we all have it and it doesnt look the same for everyone.
Stress can look like emotional distress that can be seen by others: the agitation, anger, or tremors. Or maybe your stress is more subtle, maybe you dont even think of it as stress, such as you can no longer handle certain types of foods, whether its nightshades, gluten, corn, or wheat, those are all signs of stress on the body.

More dramatic cases of stress can lead to diseases; heart disease, blood sugar disorders from lack of a proper diet, due to stress not eating properly, or other life threatening conditions.

So what can be done for stress? There are options: meditation, relaxation, a vacation, exercise or more direct therapies such as Emotional Freedom Technique (aka Tapping), journaling, and biofeedback.

What we see too much of when dealing with stress is resorting to drugs. Some drugs lead to addictions and side effects, and more problems rather than solutions. Most drugs only mask the real problem.

So why does it seem younger people are more active, vital, and interested in life? What happens to us?

As we go through life we compound stress, one stressor added to another. Dysfunctional family life, maybe the break up in high school, unplanned pregnancy, marriage, raising a family, divorce, the death of family and friends. All those things build up stress and create reactions in the body.

No wonder when we look at our aging population we see numerous ailments: emotional distress, grief, depression, and in many cases just overwhelmed by life. Old life traumas built up over time and create havoc in our lives.

If you were to look back on your life, whether young or old, and identify the stressors in your life, that will give you a great measuring tool for your current state of health. Take action to clear old and current stress so that you can live life to the fullest!

Editors Note: This article was written by Jodie MacTavish, CBP, ATC, who is a Certified Biofeedback & Auricular Therapist with Healthful Transformations. In the Grand Valley area she may be reached at 360-624-3332 (c) or by email at: Jodie.MacTavish@gmail.com

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