SBB University presents "The Importance of Heart Health: Prevention & Rehabilitation of Heart Attack

Posted on

Mar 18, 2021

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Join SBB University for a presentation by Encompass Health to learn of simple steps you can put in place to reduce all of the modifiable risk factors for heart disease, heart attack and stroke, and ways to improve your cardiovascular health if you have experienced a stroke, heart attack, heart failure, angioplasty for heart surgery (or are caring for someone who is).
Presenter: Lisa Hopkins, Area Business Development Director - Encompass Health
www.encompasshealth.com

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