SBB University | Reclaiming Sexuality During & After Caregiving

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Seniors Blue Book Greater Dallas

For more information about the author, click to view their website: Seniors Blue Book Greater Dallas

Posted on

Feb 28, 2022

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Texas - Dallas, Collin, SE Denton & Rockwall Counties

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Dr. Tanginika-Simone Cuascud Vega addresses the concerns and challenges of maintaining an active sex life and enjoying intimacy while caregiving by normalizing the conversation around sex and intimacy in the caregiving setting.
The focus of my intervention is to address the concerns and challenges of maintaining an active sex life and enjoying intimacy while caregiving by normalizing the conversation around sex and intimacy inthe caregiving setting.
The presentation will define sexual needs. Cover strategiesto deal with the physiological, mental and emotional challenges to the sexuality of caregivers. Explore ways that caregivers can reconnect with their sexuality while caregiving. Help challenge and dissipate biases regarding the importance of a healthy and active sex life in spite of being a caregiver or working to support caregivers.
Enjoy the program.

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Types of Alzheimer's Disease

Types of Alzheimer's Disease Different researchers classify Alzheimer's Disease using vastly different stages.  Alzheimer's Disease has a genetic component that becomes active in some people and dormant in others. Alzheimers creates an environment that promotes brain changes in those affected.  Lastly, amyloid plaque is the brains protective response to vastly different lifestyle insults.Alzheimers Disease is an imbalance of multiple systems within the body. People with Alzheimers disease usually have more than one type and present multiple risk factors.One of the things I like most about breaking Alzheimers into types is once you know where you stand, it is easy to begin to resolve. Dr. Bredesens books provide many examples from his patients.   Also, please keep in mind that in the descriptions below, I am cutting and pasting most of the information.  I do not want to risk misinterpreting any of Dr. Bredesens research and misinforming you. Type 1Type 1s primary characteristic is inflammation.  It tends to run in families as it is common in people who carry one or two ApoE4 alleles (ApoE in itself is considered an inflammatory gene). Individuals begin to lose the ability to store new information in the hippocampus for individuals who carry two copies of ApoE4 this tends to start in the late fifties or early sixties. For those with no copies of ApoE4, symptoms present typically in the sixties or seventies. A reduced hippocampal volume chronic inflammation encourages the brain to destroy synapses faster than it creates them.Biochemical Markers of Type 1 An increase in C-reactive protein (CRP), which is made by the liver in response to inflammation. A decrease in the ratio of albumin to globulin. An increase in interleukin-6. An increase in tumor necrosis factor. Additional metabolic and hormonal abnormalities such as insulin resistance  Type 2Type 2s primary characteristic is low levels of nutrients, hormone factors, and/or trophic factors.  Type 2 also occurs more frequently in those who carry one or two copies of the ApoE4 allele, but the symptoms tend to initiate about a decade later than the inflammatory Type 1. Individuals begin to lose the ability to form new memories in the hippocampus. However, there is little to no evidence of inflammation sometimes inflammatory markers may be lower than normal.Biochemical Markers of Type 2Levels of hormones such as thyroid, adrenal, estrogen, progesterone, testosterone, and pregnenolone tend to be suboptimal. The optimal hormone ranges are: TSH: less than 2.0 mIU/L Free T3: 3.2-4.2 pg/mL Free T4: 1.3-1.8 ng/dL Reverse T3: less than 20 ng/dL AM Cortisol: 10-18 mcg/dL Pregnenolone: 100-250 ng/dL Estradiol: 50 250 pg/ mL (women, age-dependent) Progesterone: 1-20 ng/mL (women, age-dependent) Testosterone: 500-1,000 ng/dL (men) 25-70 ng/dL (women) A decrease in serum Vitamin D levels. Normal Vitamin D levels should be 50-80 ng/mL.An increase in homocysteine levels can occur. Normal homocysteine levels should be less than or equal to 7 mol/ L (homocysteine is also seen to increase in Type 1)Insulin resistance can occur OR insulin levels may be too low.Type 1.5Type 1.5s primary characteristic is insulin resistance (diabetes). Type 1 and Type 2 Alzheimers Disease can occur together often seen with neural inflammation in addition to the reduced support for brain synapses. A commonly seen combination of type 1 and type 2 AD is known as Type 1.5 or glycotoxic Alzheimers Disease.Biochemical Markers of Type 1.5Although characteristics are similar to those found in Type 1 and Type 2 AD, blood glucose levels and hemoglobin A1c are chronically high in Type 1.5 which results in inflammation. Normal fasting blood glucose levels should be between 70-90 mg/dL Normal hemoglobin A1c levels should be 4.0-5.3% High levels of insulin that are secreted in response to this high blood glucose level lead to insulin resistance. This results in a loss of trophic support. Trophic support refers to a variety of chemical signals that neurons need to continue living. Brain cells die and the brain shrinks when you experience a loss of trophic support.Neurons are energetically expensive cells. They use a lot of oxygen and require a large expenditure of energy in the form of ATP to do their normal functions. As part of homeostatic adjustment, the body prefers to minimize extra energy usage. However, since neurons are critically important for healthy functioning, they receive signals in the form of chemicals that tell them to continue working. These chemicals are called trophic factors.Many of these trophic factors are synthesized and released by glial cells of the nervous system, the non-neuronal cells that interact closely with the neurons. Glial cells, particularly the astrocytes and Schwann cells, are well-known producers of trophic support molecules.One of the best-characterized trophic support molecules is called brain-derived neurotrophic factor, or BDNF. BDNF is a large protein. BDNF is normally synthesized and produced by cells of the nervous system and is important for making changes in neurons or for the growth of nerve cells. BDNF signals through the activity of several different receptors, the most well-known being the TrkB receptor. Other neurotrophic factors used by the nervous system that are important as trophic support molecules include nerve growth factor (NGF), neurotrophin-3, glial-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF), and ephrins. Trophic factors, such as NGF and BDNF, control the development and survival of specific groups of neurons. Type 1, Type 1.5 & Type 2 Alzheimers Disease lead to the imbalance between the production and destruction of neural synapses. Type 3Type 3s primary characteristic is exposure to toxins such as mercury, toluene, benzene (candles), or mycotoxins (mold). Type 3 tends to occur in those who have the ApoE3 allele rather than ApoE4 and does not typically run in families.Type 3 hits individuals at younger ages, typically late forties to early sixties. Symptoms do not begin with memory loss but rather with cognitive difficulties involving numbers, speech, or organization. Individuals will start seeing difficulties with: Math, such as calculating tips or bills. Speech, such as finding the right words, or spelling or reading correctly. Rules of games, such as poker or bridge. Depression and attention deficits are common. The brain ultimately loses recent and old memories.Patients with Type 3 are often diagnosed initially with something other than Alzheimers Disease such as depression or frontotemporal dementia. Biochemical Markers of Type 3 Low triglyceride levels as compared to cholesterol levels. MRI scans show shrinkage of the hippocampus. Neuroinflammation and vascular leaks are presented on a specific MRI called FLAIR (Fluid-attenuated inversion recovery) as white spots. Decreased zinc levels. Normal levels are between 90-110 mcg/dL. Elevated copper levels. Normal copper levels are between 90-110 mcg/dL. High blood levels of toxic chemicals such as mercury or mycotoxins (caused by molds). The pituitary gland and adrenal glands become dysfunctional, which can show up in lab tests as hormonal abnormalities. Type 4Type 4s primary characteristic is low blood flow to the brain. Type 4 or Vascular Alzheimers Disease, is caused by a reduction of blood flow to the brain, which ultimately deprives the brain of essential oxygen and nutrients. The brain is an extremely vascularized tissue, meaning it requires large amounts of oxygen. A lack of oxygen to the brain leads to hypoperfusion (low blood flow) and compromises the blood-brain barrier which allows for harmful substances to leak in and damage neurons. Cerebral vasculature is extremely important as it is one way the body clears the accumulation of amyloid-beta.Biochemical Markers of Type 4Leakiness present in vascular tissues.Individuals with cardiovascular disease have a high risk for Type 4 Alzheimers.These individuals do best when they prioritize healing underlying insulin resistance. Type 5Type 5s primary characteristic is brain damage. Type 5 or trauma-induced Alzheimers, results from traumatic brain injuries (TBI) which disrupt normal brain function, including learning and thinking skills. Certain types of TBIs may increase the risk of developing Alzheimers disease years after the injury takes place.One of the most impactful studies showed that those with a history of moderate TBI had a 2.3 times greater risk of developing Alzheimers than older adults with no history of a head injury and those with a history of severe TBI had a 4.5 times greater risk.Biochemical Markers of Type 5There are no biochemical markers for Type 5 as it is triggered by injuries to the brain such as: Blunt force trauma Concussions Physical Abuse Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) Now that we have broken down Alzheimers Disease into 6 different types and identified their characteristics and potential causes we can begin to address what you need to do to prevent and begin to heal the damaging insults to the brain.  We will begin to work on that next week. OR if you want to jump ahead, purchase Dr. Dale Bredesens books.  Here are the links to purchase them on Amazon.The End of Alzheimers 2 Books Collection Set By Dale Bredesen Paperback October 26, 2023LINK: https://amzn.to/462LcY3 The End of Alzheimer's Program: The First Protocol to Enhance Cognition and Reverse Decline at Any Age Paperback September 6, 2022LINK: https://amzn.to/3xNcrct

Horticultural Therapy Garden Connects Someren Glen Residents with Nature Year-Round

Though the temperatures along the Colorado Front Range have dropped and the sun sets well before 5pm, the growing season has only just begun at The Suites at Someren Glen skilled nursing and memory support neighborhood. Our flourishing community was recently gifted a horticultural therapy garden from Eldergrow through the legacy of former Christian Living Communities residents and supporters, Gil and Jeanette Deters.Enriching Community Life through Horticultural TherapyOur new garden from Eldergrows Therapeutic Horticulture Program brings nature indoors. It is thoughtfully designed for older adults living in skilled nursing and memory care communities like Someren Glen. The accessible, sustainable, and mobile garden includes a variety of eye-catching and beautifully fragrant plants, providing the kind of sensory experience that can only come from time spent among nature.With the support and expertise of Eldergrow educators, Someren Glen residents planted their garden in September and have since enjoyed the connection, calm, and happiness that comes with nurturing a garden. Teaming with Eldergrow increases residents ability to interact with nature throughout the year, providing a hands-on experience to care for and learn from the Eldergrow garden, shares Steve DeBelle, Executive Director at Someren Glen.Every two weeks, Eldergrow educators visit our community to teach classes and support residents as they connect with the plants multi-sensory characteristics, learn garden care, and maintain the health and growth of the garden. DeBelle is already seeing the impacts of the garden, sharing, The residents love it. They are very engaged in caring for the garden. It was a wonderful addition to our community.For one of the gardens caretakers, Someren Glen resident Shirl, the new garden brought back dear memories of her grandmother, who grew and tended roses. The plants give back so much to us, she expressed. I feel so proud of this garden!The Benefits of Horticultural Therapy for Older AdultsIn addition to the joy and delight already being felt from tending the Eldergrow garden, its potential long-term benefits for Someren Glens residents are significant. Studies indicate that therapeutic horticulture can reduce depression, improve balance, and lower risk factors for dementia. According to the Mather Institute, an organization focused on aging services research, a review of 20 years of research studying the impacts of indoor nature interventions in residential care environments showed that the positive outcomes of active interventions such as those provided through Eldergrows Therapeutic Horticulture Program included improved psychological well-being, life satisfaction, social well-being, engagement, and quality of life.How CLC Supporters Make The Fine Art of Living Possible at Someren GlenAs a neighborhood of Christian Living Communities, a nonprofit organization with a mission of enriching the lives of older adults, Someren Glen is a creation and expression of the exceptional residents who call our community home and those who have come before them, such as Gil and Jeanette Deters. The CLC community held a great significance to the Deters, who planned for their love and caring to extend to this community beyond their lifetimes.This is the 16th year that the Deters gift has enriched the lives of residents at The Suites at Someren Glen. Their legacy lives on in the hearts of the many older adults and families who have been impacted by their generosity. Someren Glen can strive for and sustain our vision, mission, and values because of the investment of donor support. Learn more about supporting Someren Glen and other CLC communities at www.christianlivingcommunities.org/support-our-mission.Contact us today to learn more about our long-term care services, purpose-filled life enrichment programming, and award-winning skilled nursing neighborhood at The Suites at Someren Glen.

Pet-Friendly Summer Activities for Seniors: Enjoying the Season with Your Furry Friends

Ah, the dog days of summer! And no, were not just talking about the heat. Longer daylight hours and warm weather make it the ideal season for fun-filled adventures with your furry friends. On days that are too nice to stay indoors, why not have some fun in the sun with your dog (or daring cat)?Whether you and your pet want to break a sweat on a hiking trail or cool down with a sweet treat, theres something to suit every activity level and interest. To help you plan the perfect day, the Seniors Helping Seniors team has gathered some fantastic pet-friendly summer activities for you and your four-legged companion.In this article, well share fun activities for seniors and their pets to enjoy together. Plus, well give you tips to stay safe and cool outdoors! So, grab your furry friend and get ready for a perfect summer adventure.Must-Try Pet Bonding Experiences for Your Summer ItinerarySpending time with pets isnt just enjoyableits also beneficial for seniors health and well-being. Studies have shown that animal ownership can lower stress levels, reduce feelings of loneliness, and even lower blood pressure. Plus, the companionship and unconditional love our pets provide can brighten even the dreariest of days.Keep reading to discover easy, exciting ways to celebrate the season with your beloved pets and make this summer one to remember!Explore the OutdoorsTake a detour from your dogs usual morning walk by heading to a local park. Going on a leisurely hike is a great way to stay active, connect with nature, and enjoy the sunshine. The fresh air and scenic views are sure to make you both feel rejuvenated. Remember to bring plenty of water and take breaks in the shade to keep your pet cool and comfortable.Take a Day TripVisit a nearby pet-friendly beach, a charming small town, or a picturesque countryside spot. You can ask your Seniors Helping Seniors caregiver to assist in researching the best pet-welcoming locations nearby so that you and your furry friend can have a fun outing. Hit the open road for an enriching little getaway filled with laughter, tail wags, and sunny memories!Splash AroundTurn your backyard into a summer playground by setting up sprinklers or a kiddie pool for your pet! This simple and fun activity can provide hours of entertainment and a great way to cool off. Watch your pet frolic and splash in the water, bringing joy and laughter to both of you. Its an easy way to stay active and beat the heat together.Pack a PicnicEnjoy a delightful picnic with your pet in a neighborhood park or your backyard. Load up some pet-friendly treats and a comfy blanket and relax under the shade of a tree. A Seniors Helping Seniors caregiver would be happy to help prepare a healthy summer recipe for your picnic. Its a wonderful way to spend quality time together while soaking up the sun. Dont forget to bring some toys for extra fun and entertainment.Attend a Dog Swim DayIf your dog is a strong swimmer, check out local pools or community centers for Dog Swim Day events! These special days, usually occurring at the end of the summer, allow dogs to swim and play in the pool. It provides a fantastic opportunity for exercise and socialization that both you and your pup will love. Make sure to bring a towel and some treats for after the swim!Make Pet-Friendly Ice CreamTreat your pet to homemade ice cream! Use ingredients like yogurt, peanut butter, and fruit to create delicious and safe treats for your furry friend. Make sure to check with your vet before giving your pet new foods. Not only will your furry companion love the tasty reward, but its also a wonderful way to cool down on a hot summer day.Visit an Animal ShelterFor seniors who dont have pets, take a trip to your local animal shelter with a Seniors Helping Seniors companion! Spend time cuddling and playing with the animals, offering them love and companionship. Its a heartwarming experience that can bring joy to both you and the shelter animals. Who knows, you might even come home with a new furry friend!The Seniors Helping Seniors family understands the importance of maintaining a strong bond with furry friends while ensuring your safety and well-being. Remember to take a few precautions during the hot summer months.Here are a few tips to ensure a safe and enjoyable summer for you and your pet:Stay Hydrated: Make sure both you and your pet have access to plenty of water, especially during outdoor activities.Avoid Peak Heat: To prevent overheating, try to schedule outdoor activities during the cooler parts of the day, such as early morning or late evening.Watch for Signs of Overheating: Keep an eye out for signs of heatstroke in your pet, such as excessive panting, drooling, or lethargy. If you suspect your pet is overheating, move them to a cooler area and provide water immediately.If youre a senior looking for assistance in enjoying these pet-friendly summer activities or are interested in learning more about Seniors Helping Seniors caregiving services, dont hesitate to reach out. Our compassionate team is here to help you make the most of this summer season with your beloved pets.The post Pet-Friendly Summer Activities for Seniors: Enjoying the Season with Your Furry Friends appeared first on Seniors Helping Seniors.

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Seniors Blue Book Greater Dallas

Senior Resources 2220 Coit Rd Ste 480-216, Plano, Texas, 75075

"Seniors Blue Book Greater Dallas is the #1 trusted caregiving and senior care resource for the Greater Dallas and Fort-Worth areas for older adults. Search our senior directory to find luxury senior housing, senior living and retirement communities. Independent living, assisted living, memory care, nursing homes, hospitals, rehab care, residential care homes & housing locators. Aging in place? Our senior directory has great in-home care and services, home care, home health & hospice. The Best Senior Services, downsizing, junk removal and clutter clean-up, organizing, moving, estate planning, Medicaid planning, elder law, elder care, and the list goes on! You can find great in-home care and services to age in place or a place for mom to move to. Seniors Blue Book is your everything for aging resource and directory!" The Seniors Blue Book Greater Dallas print seniors resource directory can be found in Dallas, Frisco, Plano, Allen, McKinney, Addison, Garland, Rockwall, Mesquite, Highland Park, Park Cities, Denton, Little Elm, Prosper, Lewisville, Flower Mound, Grand Prairie, Irving, Fort Worth, Southlake, Colleyville, The ColonyPick-up a copy of Seniors Blue Book Greater Dallas at a Grocery Store Near You!Click HERE for GROCERY STORE LOCATIONS