Validation | The Importance of Time and Place

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Atrium at Liberty Park

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Posted on

Jul 18, 2023

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Florida - Southwest

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he ability to discern time and place is a bedrock of civilized life, anchoring us to reality. When we say: “There is a time and place for everything,” we mean everything has a proper or appropriate time and place in our world. As soon as we make social plans with others, we designate the time and place to meet. These concepts of the real world are so ingrained in each of us that we often take them for granted. Recently a friend took a fall while jogging outside and temporarily lost consciousness. When the emergency team came, our friend had no recollection of the immediate event and was somewhat disoriented. For a brief time he lost that connection with what is familiar and surrounds him. He was fortunate that his reality orientation and memories returned rather quickly after he received medical treatment. Temporary disorientation can be a response to a trauma like a fall or a situation. Some of us have experienced a glimpse of time distortion during the prolonged coronavirus shutdown. Without our usual schedule of responsibilities and activities, we have at times slept too much and other times too little. Sometimes 3am has felt like 3pm. Our sense of place is blurred by working at home in pajamas.

Now imagine how loss of orientation and memory affects so many older adults living with dementia on a daily basis. Their reality has been permanently altered by cognitive decline. They cannot always feel the happiness of enjoying their own birthday party or  recalling yesterday’s family visit. They may be confused about whether a visitor is their son or grandson or a stranger. Time is no longer meaningful in the present. Their careers, which had given them self-esteem and recognition, are now lost in the distant past.  There are often no young children to nurture or spouses to love. Today’s world is full of loss, loneliness,  and difficulty coping with  the prospect of death. Our reality escapes their grasp; they retreat into their own personal realities, which often fixate on the comforting nostalgia of the past rather than the challenges of the  present.

The Validation  method was created by Naomi Feil to help family members and caregivers communicate with older adults in various stages of disorientation as they struggle to resolve emotional unfinished business, so that they can die in peace.  Naomi  designed  appropriate techniques to use for each stage. She asks that we step into the shoes of those living with Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias and show them respect and empathy. She helps caregivers change their behaviors so they can be there for the other person and share feelings together. Her method does not patronize or placate or stigmatize. It values  individuals as they are today, and does not try to cure them or  fit them into our view of reality if they don’t grasp it themselves. By stepping into their shoes, we can accompany them on their final emotional journey and reassure them that they are not alone. All of us can learn valuable lessons from our current glimpse into a different reality and perhaps develop more empathy for those removed from it.

This week our hearts go out to families who are physically separated and unable to care for or even visit each other during the coronavirus lockdown. We also appreciate those who manage or provide care in facilities especially when older adults are unable to see their families in-person at this time.

By: Fran Bulloff, VTI President

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Having the Tough Conversation with Your Parents about Senior Living

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How to Reduce Caregiver Stress

As our population ages, providing care for aging parents is becoming more common by the day.Over the past several years, we have seen a dramatic increase in adults providing care for their spouses or aging parents. While providing this service to your family can be rewarding, it can also take a toll on your personal life in the form of financial stress, having drastically less personal time, feeling drained and generally overwhelmed.The holiday season is a particularly stressful time for caregivers. Providing care to your loved one, taking care of your own family and making time for yourself is a delicate balancing act that can all too quickly fall apart. Its easy to dedicate too much time to the others while not enough for yourself, increasing the risk of burnout and fatigue. 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Types of Alzheimer's Disease

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Local Services By This Author

Atrium at Liberty Park

Memory Care 1321 NE 24th Ave., Cape Coral, Florida, 33909

Atrium at Liberty Park offers supportive independent living, assisted living, and memory care services in Cape Coral, Florida. Voted Best Assisted Living by U.S. News & World Report for 2023-2024, our community provides an exciting and fulfilling lifestyle for seniors.Services: At Atrium at Liberty Park, youll find more than senior living services. Youll find community. Feel confident that our experienced senior care team is invested in your health and wellbeing. Enjoy a senior living community where its easy to fill your days with opportunities for fun and engagement. Our goal is to enrich the lives of those who call Atrium at Liberty Park home. We offer an array of programs and services that focus on whole-body wellness whether its creating an opportunity to socialize and make new friendships or participating in daily activities designed to strengthen your body and mind. For more information, visit the Lifestyle page.Lifestyle: Living at Atrium at Liberty Park is a fresh start to let go of responsibility and do more of what makes you happy. Relish in the simple pleasures and leave behind the burdens of owning and maintaining a home. We take care of everything, leaving you with more time for new friendships and hobbies, daily adventures, or maybe just more time to relax and be pampered.Memory Care: For residents with Alzheimers or other dementia, Atrium at Liberty Park is proud to feature MONTESSORI MOMENTS IN TIME memory care programming. We make every day feel special for your loved one with exceptional care and success-oriented programming that brings a sense of purpose and meaning to your loved one's experience at Atrium at Liberty Park.Contact us today to learn more about our community and how we can provide the tranquility and care your family deserves.

Atrium at Liberty Park

Independent Living 1321 NE 24th Ave., Cape Coral, Florida, 33909

Atrium at Liberty Park offers supportive independent living, assisted living, and memory care services in Cape Coral, Florida. Voted Best Assisted Living by U.S. News & World Report for 2023-2024, our community provides an exciting and fulfilling lifestyle for seniors.Services: At Atrium at Liberty Park, youll find more than senior living services. Youll find community. Feel confident that our experienced senior care team is invested in your health and wellbeing. Enjoy a senior living community where its easy to fill your days with opportunities for fun and engagement. Our goal is to enrich the lives of those who call Atrium at Liberty Park home. We offer an array of programs and services that focus on whole-body wellness whether its creating an opportunity to socialize and make new friendships or participating in daily activities designed to strengthen your body and mind. For more information, visit the Lifestyle page.Lifestyle: Living at Atrium at Liberty Park is a fresh start to let go of responsibility and do more of what makes you happy. Relish in the simple pleasures and leave behind the burdens of owning and maintaining a home. We take care of everything, leaving you with more time for new friendships and hobbies, daily adventures, or maybe just more time to relax and be pampered.Memory Care: For residents with Alzheimers or other dementia, Atrium at Liberty Park is proud to feature MONTESSORI MOMENTS IN TIME memory care programming. We make every day feel special for your loved one with exceptional care and success-oriented programming that brings a sense of purpose and meaning to your loved one's experience at Atrium at Liberty Park.Contact us today to learn more about our community and how we can provide the tranquility and care your family deserves.

Atrium at Liberty Park

Assisted Living 1321 NE 24th Ave., Cape Coral, Florida, 33909

Atrium at Liberty Park offers supportive independent living, assisted living, and memory care services in Cape Coral, Florida. Voted Best Assisted Living by U.S. News & World Report for 2023-2024, our community provides an exciting and fulfilling lifestyle for seniors.Services: At Atrium at Liberty Park, youll find more than senior living services. Youll find community. Feel confident that our experienced senior care team is invested in your health and wellbeing. Enjoy a senior living community where its easy to fill your days with opportunities for fun and engagement. Our goal is to enrich the lives of those who call Atrium at Liberty Park home. We offer an array of programs and services that focus on whole-body wellness whether its creating an opportunity to socialize and make new friendships or participating in daily activities designed to strengthen your body and mind. For more information, visit the Lifestyle page.Lifestyle: Living at Atrium at Liberty Park is a fresh start to let go of responsibility and do more of what makes you happy. Relish in the simple pleasures and leave behind the burdens of owning and maintaining a home. We take care of everything, leaving you with more time for new friendships and hobbies, daily adventures, or maybe just more time to relax and be pampered.Memory Care: For residents with Alzheimers or other dementia, Atrium at Liberty Park is proud to feature MONTESSORI MOMENTS IN TIME memory care programming. We make every day feel special for your loved one with exceptional care and success-oriented programming that brings a sense of purpose and meaning to your loved one's experience at Atrium at Liberty Park.Contact us today to learn more about our community and how we can provide the tranquility and care your family deserves.