When is the Right Age to Retire?

Posted on

May 27, 2021

Share This
For more information on the author The Sheridan at Lakewood Ranch, CLICK HERE.
Retirement planning. These may involve chats about employer percentages, being vested (or not), and quiet outrage at retail prices of motorhomes. However, there is one important piece always missing from retirement conversation: The target retirement age.
As of February 2019, the average age of retirement is 59.88 years old. Ofcourse, plenty of Americans retire before and after this age, for a variety of reasons. Surprisingly, 76%of employees say theyll keep working past retirement age, and 35% of those people will do so because they have to.
For most people, it is a foregone conclusion that sixty-five is the magic number. However, the right age varies significantly from person to person. Discover what age might be right for you and then take steps to make sure you are ready!
Taking an Early Retirement
Early retirement is generally referred to as retirement before a persons ability to draw from Social Security or pension benefits (usually age 55-64 depending on their career field). The ability to retire early usually relies on the person having good financial stability, but can be influenced by personal factors such as health concerns or waning interest in a career. Often touted as the ultimate goal, early retirement can be more complicated than it first seems.
Early retirement might be the right choice for you, but you should evaluate your long-term and financial standing before you take the leap.
Benefits of Early Retirement

Reduction of stress
More free time
Ability to pursue passions
Potentially healthier and longer retirement

Downsides of Early Retirement

Less time to grow investments
Longer time of living off savings or fixed income
A potential loss of purpose or drive

Delaying Retirement
Late or delayed retirement is a term reserved for individuals waiting until after sixty-five to retire, although that age will change as Social Security benefit dates adjust for baby boomers. You may have good reason to wait until your late sixties or early seventies to retire, whether its a love of your profession or the need to get more financially secure. As with early retirement, you have to weigh the costs and benefits of waiting.
Benefits of Late Retirement

More time to grow your investments and portfolio
Maximizing Social Security payments
A continued sense of purpose from your career

Downsides of Late Retirement

Work-related health decline
Potentially shorter retirement
Not transitioning to retirement with spouse or peers

Investments and Ongoing Financial Stability
Whether you choose an early, delayed, or regular retirement date will depend heavily on your ability to finance the years ahead of you in retirement. Utilize a financial advisor to ensure you have enough money to not only meet your needs, but also achieve your goals throughout retirement. Make sure you discuss your desired lifestyle, long-term care options, and plans for big-ticket items like trips or vacation homes. Then you can decide if your current savings meets those needs.
The most common forms of retirement savings are:
1)Social Security
2)Pensions
3)IRAs
4)401k
5)Annuities
Throughout your work life, you may have accrued one or many of these investment accounts. Be diligent in researching, tracking, and forecasting each account to determine an overall projected retirement income. That figure can give you a good idea of what age you will be able to retire in comfort.
Personal and Health Concerns
Money isnt everything. If you have a chronic health condition that is worsened by work-related stress, or feel like you are missing out on important family milestones or time with your grandchildren, it may be time to call it quits.
On the other hand, economists have found that retirees have an average medical spend of roughly $122,000in medical costs after the age of 70. Health concerns are a huge aspect of any retirement consideration, and saving as much as possible for retirement is certainly a priority.
For some people, downsizing and simplifying their lifestyles is enough to make retirement attainable. For others, putting off retirement for a few years allows them to save money, without sacrificing quality of life. Many people have found that retirement communities are the most affordable option, when considering the rising costs of in-home caregiving, medication, and the costs of catastrophic care.
The Right Retirement Age? It Depends.
There is not a perfect age for retirement. In the end, you need to fully understand your personal goals, health, and financial means to come to the right decision and retire at the age right for you.
Independent Living communities can be a practical way to consolidate your expenses and reach your retirement goals. Learn more about our communities and calculate your retirement costs to better understand your options.

Other Articles You May Like

What to Do When a Loved One Refuses to Recognize Health Concerns

What to Do When a Loved One Refuses to Recognize Health ConcernsProviding care for a family member as they age or face health challenges is an act of kindness that can bring you closer together, but what if your loved one doesnt share your concerns about their health? Recognizing health concerns is the first step toward finding the right support, but denial can be a formidable obstacle. Community Senior Lifes senior living communities in Alabama are dedicated to creating a safe and empowering environment for residents. We tailor our services to meet each individuals unique lifestyle, preferences, and needs, and were sharing some valuable insights into what to do when your family member refuses to acknowledge health concerns.Recognizing Health ConcernsThe health and well-being of our family members are often at the forefront of our minds. However, when those we care about refuse to acknowledge health concerns, it can become a source of tension and constant worry.Understanding the root of this denial and developing a strategy to address it is essential not just for their health but also for maintaining a trusting relationship.There could be numerous reasons why someone might refuse to acknowledge health concerns. Fear of a potential diagnosis, the perceived stigma associated with illness, or simply the reluctance to face the reality of aging can prompt denial. There are also many emotional factors that can come into play in these situations as well, such as pride, fear of losing independence, or a desire not to cause worry among family members.Approaching the IssueWhen initiating this difficult conversation, its critical to approach your family member with empathy and actively listen to their perspective. Choose a time and place where you can communicate honestly, calmly, and without any distractions. Its essential to voice your concerns without casting judgment or assigning blame, as this can often deepen their resistance. Reassurance is key, and by telling your loved one that you want to help them rather than make them feel bad, you can create a sense of support. Here are some ways you can express these feelings: I want you to enjoy the best quality of life that you can; you deserve it! I understand that you want to remain independent. Can we talk more about how senior living can help you do that? You mean so much to me, and I would love to have the opportunity to help you. Seeking a Support SystemA united front can also be very effective when discussing the situation, and including other family members can help ensure everyone delivers the same message of concern and support. Sometimes, the authority of a professional can make all the difference when encouraging your loved one to visit a healthcare provider. It can help alleviate their apprehensions and provide them with the guidance they need to seek a proper assessment and get advice. If they remain resistant, including a therapist or counselors unbiased and professional opinion in these discussions could be beneficial.Aside from therapy or counseling, you can also turn to your family members close friends, neighbors, or even a community figure that your loved one trusts. This will strengthen the support system surrounding your loved one and help emphasize just how important they are to the people around them. Taking Care of YourselfWhile caring for others, dont forget to take care of yourself. Managing your emotions and stress is vital for your health, so contact your close friends, discover support groups, or even consult professional support for your emotional well-being. Additionally, be sure to get quality sleep and plenty of exercise to maintain your physical health.Facing a family member who denies their health issues is a daunting task, but its a challenge that requires persistence, patience, and, most importantly, love. Your support and understanding can make all the difference in helping them recognize the need for care.Remember, youre not alone in this journey, and with the right approach, your family member can get the help they need to live a healthier and fuller life.Community Senior Life understands that recognizing health concerns is only the starting point, and were here to remind you that with time, your efforts can lead to better health and quality of life for those you cherish most. Our senior living communities in Alabama aim to provide the comfort and peace of mind that families need when their loved one is facing difficult times.  Contact our senior living team at 251-981-0200 in Alabama today to learn more!

How to Help a Parent Overcome Their Fear of Senior Living in Alabama

How to Help a Parent Overcome Their Fear of Senior Living in AlabamaHaving a parent transition into a senior living community can be a complex and emotional process. While these communities offer numerous benefits and a comfortable, supportive environment for our family members, the decision to move can often be clouded by fear and uncertainty. There are ways, though, that you can help your parent through this transition, ensuring it goes as smoothly and positively as possible.Community Senior Life provides exceptional senior living services throughout Alabama, and we understand how difficult it can be for families to reassure their loved ones about this important next step in life. Our team is exploring practical and emotional strategies that you can employ to help your parent overcome their fear of moving to a senior living community.Understanding the FearBefore addressing how to assist your parent in transitioning to a senior living community, it is crucial to comprehend the root cause of their fear. Common reasons for the reluctance to move may include:Loss of IndependenceMany aging adults fear losing their autonomy and the sense of freedom that comes with living in their own homes. Senior living can seem like a step toward dependence on others, but this is just a myth.Nostalgia and Emotional AttachmentsThe family home often represents years of memories and is deeply tied to ones identity. The idea of leaving this space can be emotionally overwhelming.Medical and Health ConcernsIndividuals may have concerns about accessibility to healthcare, the competence of caregivers, or the stability of their health in a new environment.Financial WorriesThe costs associated with senior living can be daunting. Individuals commonly worry about depleting their savings or having financial disruptions.Fear of the UnknownSenior living communities in Alabama represent a significant shift in lifestyle. The unknown aspects of this change can provoke anxiety and resistance.Acknowledging and discussing these fears with sensitivity and empathy is the first step toward helping your parent.Tips for Alleviating FearOpen CommunicationEncouraging open and honest discussions can help clarify your parents concerns. Its essential to create a safe space for them to express their fears without judgment. Active listening is key; reflect on their concerns and avoid the impulse to immediately provide solutions.Research and InvolvementInvolve your parent actively in the process. Researching and visiting senior living communities together can provide a sense of control and familiarity. Ensure their preferences and needs are taken into account during this exploratory phase.Emotional SupportProvide ongoing emotional support. Moving is a significant life event, and its natural for your parent to experience a range of emotions. Validate their feelings and share your own experiences or stories of others who have made successful transitions to senior living in Alabama.Practical AssistanceOffer tangible help with the logistics of the move. This can include organizing, packing, and arranging for the sale or donation of unnecessary items. Planning the move in advance and breaking down tasks into manageable steps can alleviate stress.Facilitating AdjustmentAssist your parent in settling into their new community. This might involve personalizing their living space with familiar items or helping them to meet their new neighbors and caregivers. Encourage their participation in community activities and ensure they feel connected and supported in their new environment.By employing these strategies, you can greatly facilitate the process and allay your parents fears about transitioning to a senior living community.The Journey ForwardThe decision to move to a senior living community in Alabama is a significant marker in the aging process. Its a time that involves immense change and the potential for growth, even amidst the fear it may provoke. For you, this is also an opportunity to demonstrate care, sensitivity, and a desire to see your parents flourish in their retirement years.Through patience, open communication, and a willingness to understand your parents perspective, the transition to senior living doesnt have to be a fearful one. By being present and actively involved in the decision-making, you can help ensure that your parents move is a positive step toward a nurturing, supported, and engaged lifestyle.Adjusting to senior living is a process that unfolds over time, requiring both your support and your parents resilience. Remember that you are not alone in this endeavor. Senior living community team members are there to assist every step of the way, and many resources are available to help ease the transition.Though the fear of moving to a senior living community is real, it is a bridge to a brighter, more secure future for your parent. Your role is to walk that bridge with them, offering a steady presence and a reassuring voice. You can help your parent find a home that not only caters to their needs but also to their desires, leading to a fulfilling life after retirement.Contact the Community Senior Life team at 251-981-0200 today at to learn more about our senior living communities in Alabama!

Caregiver Tips

Our Tips to Excel at Caring for a Loved OneBeing a caregiver means offering compassionate care for someone who needs it, whether due to aging, illness or disability. Family caregivers play a vital role in keeping their loved ones safe and healthy, but the job often goes beyond that. They're also companions who offer a friendly listening ear when needed and a reassuring presence when making important decisions. BrightStar Care aims to appreciate and support caregivers all year long. If you are a caregiver or know someone who is, be sure to check out our tips for high-quality care and avoiding caregiver burnout.Questions Every Caregiver Should Ask Over 40 million people(Opens in a new window) in the United States provided unpaid care to someone in the last 12 months. This statistic shows the massive need for caregivers in our country. However, new family caregivers often don't know where to start when they begin caring for a loved one. Below, you'll find several questions to get you started as a compassionate caregiver.Ask About Support Systems and ResourcesFirst, you'll want to pin down details about your loved one's support system. Ask these questions of yourself and your loved one:Will you be the only one providing care for your loved one?If anyone, who will be helping you? Do you have these individuals' names, addresses and emergency phone numbers?Do other family members or friends live nearby? Will they be helping you provide care? Does your loved one spend any time with them?Does your loved one receive financial, personal or medical assistance? Is this assistance temporary or permanent?Does your loved one have adequate insurance? What services aren't covered?Does your loved one have a will or trust? Could you locate these documents if needed?Who are their medical providers? When are your loved ones appointments? Who will be providing care? When will they be providing it? Who will be managing a schedule of who will be providing care when? What is your loved ones monthly budget? What insurance or government programs are supporting them? Understanding a Day in Their LifeNext, consider your loved one's current routines and standard of living. Think about these questions to get a good idea of their daily needs:How does your loved one get around? Do they use assistive devices like canes, stability bars or walkers? How often are they used, and for what types of activities?What activities make up their daily routine? Which are more difficult? Activities might include climbing stairs, bathing, cooking, cleaning, etc.Does your loved one leave their home? If so, when and why? (i.e., to visit a senior center, socializing, church)What organizations or faith-based groups does your loved one belong to? Write down associated names, addresses and phone numbers.What are your loved one's hobbies? What do they like to watch, read and do?Does your loved one have special dietary needs(Opens in a new window)? Can they accommodate these needs alone? Do they need assistance with shopping or cooking?Does your loved one have pets? Are they still able to care for these pets?What medications does your loved one take? Note all medications, dosage and when they should be taken.Does your loved one have trouble taking medications? How so?Consider Their Everyday Surroundings Finally, it's time to think about what day-to-day life looks like for your loved one and what kind of environment they live in. Ask the following questions to get a clear picture of their surroundings:Where does your loved one live? Do they have a house, apartment or condo? Is their environment urban or rural?Is the size of their living quarters appropriate? Is their home too big, too small or just right?Are there any barriers(Opens in a new window) (i.e., stairs, rough walkways, heavy doors) that make living in their home difficult? How can these barriers be removed?Are your loved one's living quarters secure? Are they at risk for unwelcome visitors like solicitors or scammers?How far does your loved one live from neighbors?Does your loved one need transportation to the grocery store, church, social events, etc.? Seek Resources to Provide the Best Care Caregiving truly takes a village. Once you have a clear understanding of your loved one's support system and daily life, seek resources to fill the gaps in your knowledge. Having places to look for reliable information goes a long way to alleviating a family caregiver's burden. Try these resources to help you provide exceptional care:Eldercare Locator:(Opens in a new window) This locator offered by the U.S. Administration on Aging is an easy way to find services for older adults.National Council on Aging:(Opens in a new window) NCOA is recognized as a national expert on aging and works to help older folks meet the challenges associated with getting older.National Association of Area Agencies on Aging:(Opens in a new window) This organization works with care agencies and assists them with building their capabilities.Family Caregiver Alliance:(Opens in a new window) The Family Caregiver Alliance is a nonprofit organization working to meet the needs of family members providing long-term care to their loved ones at home.Caregiver Action Network:(Opens in a new window) This organization aims to support caregivers and ensure they don't feel isolated and burnt out.National Alliance for Caregiving:(Opens in a new window) The National Alliance for Caregiving focuses on improving the lives of family caregivers. Their resources may help reduce caregiver stress.Access to Respite Care and Help:(Opens in a new window) Respite care is crucial for families across the U.S. This nonprofit promotes these services for family caregivers and their loved ones.American Association of Caregiving Youth:(Opens in a new window) This organization recognizes and supports children who care for ill, aging and disabled family members.U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs:(Opens in a new window) The Department of Veterans Affairs is dedicated to assisting people who have served in the military.Home Care Guide:(Opens in a new window) BrightStar Care is proud to offer numerous resources for those struggling with caregiver stress. This resource provides things to consider when looking for caregiving services for family members. Don't Forget to Take Care of Yourself! Caring for the caregiver is just as important as providing impeccable care to aging or ill individuals. But between work and caring for loved ones full-time, finding time for oneself can feel like an insurmountable challenge. If you're feeling stressed and burnt out, try our self-care tips:List Self-Care Activities You EnjoyThe first step to avoiding burnout is to figure out just what you'd like to do with your free time. Make a list of the activities that help you recharge after a stressful day. Write as many as you can think of, then pencil in time every day to do at least one. Here are some ideas for daily self-care:Take a short walk, stretch or do light exerciseCall a friend or family memberWatch your favorite TV show or read a bookTake a long shower or bath (bonus points for using aromatherapy!)Play with a petWrite in a journalHave a cup of tea or enjoy another favorite beverageTry a new recipeMeditate or praySet Achievable Goals for YourselfGoal setting is a great way to minimize caregiver burnout symptoms. What do you hope to achieve in the next week? What about in a month? Set achievable, measurable goals that don't raise your risk of guilt or negativity. Consider making self-care one of your goals. For example, you could say that you'll read for at least 15 minutes before bed or try one new recipe every week.Reward Yourself OftenYou've done an excellent job caring for your family member and deserve a reward! When you accomplish a goal, conquer a challenge or just make it through a tough day, be sure to reward yourself with something that brings you joy. Your reward could be something like the following:A massage, pedicure or facialA fancy cup of coffeeA night out with friendsYour favorite mealA day off workA new book or movieA day at the spa or hair salonPractice Self-CompassionBe kind to yourself! You spend most of your time having compassion for others, but it's essential to have the same understanding for your own feelings. Forget about being perfect and use mistakes as opportunities to grow and improve. Caregiving is challenging and known to cause stress and burnoutdon't make it harder for yourself with negative self-talk. Your best is enough!Get Plenty of SleepGetting enough sleep is easier said than done. However, we highly recommend making sleep a priority. If you have trouble falling asleep, try turning off your TV and phone at least an hour before bed. Make sure the room is cool, quiet and dark to promote restful sleep. If you're still struggling to get a good night's sleep, try incorporating breathing techniques or meditation into your bedtime routine.Focus on a Proper Diet Eating healthy is crucial for family caregivers. A proper diet will ensure you have enough energy to provide the best care possible. Introduce lots of whole grains, fruits and veggies to your diet, and minimize sugary drinks and processed foods. Don't forget to drink plenty of water throughout the day. We know stress eating is a tempting coping mechanism, but a healthy diet will make you feel so much better in the long run.Make Others Aware of Your NeedsMany people try to stuff their feelings down and deal with them alone. But no one will know you need help if you don't express your feelings! Don't be afraid to communicate your struggles and remember to reach out to your support system before hitting your breaking point. Simply having someone to vent to can reduce burnout.Join a Caregiver Support Group Sometimes, talking to friends and family members isn't enough. In that case, consider joining an in-person or online support group. These groups will connect you with professionals and other family caregivers who know what you're going through. Chatting with these people can be extremely therapeutic and give you new ideas for how to care for your loved one. You may also want to start meeting with a local therapist to talk through your feelings.Caregiver Fatigue and What Triggers It Caregiver fatigue,(Opens in a new window) also known as caregiver burnout, refers to the physical, emotional, and mental exhaustion experienced by those who provide care for someone else over an extended period of time. At first, caregivers might just feel physically tired. However, as caregiver burnout progresses, they may also begin to experience depression, feelings of helplessness, low self-esteem, sleep deprivation, and other personal health problems. Here are some triggers of burnout to watch out for: High Stress: Caregiving often involves managing multiple responsibilities, such as medical appointments, medications and personal care. Taken together, these tasks can lead to high levels of stress.Conflicting Demands: Today, many caregivers do double duty. They might provide care to an aging loved one while juggling work and caring for children. These conflicting demands only elevate stress as caregivers try to meet everyone's needs at the same time.Emotional Strain: Witnessing the decline or suffering of a loved one can take a significant emotional toll on caregivers, leading to feelings of sadness, frustration and helplessness.Lack of Self-Care: When stress levels are high and time is at a premium, it's easy to let self-care fall by the wayside. But the temporary relief of skipping self-care can lead to increased caregiver burnout down the line.Ambiguous Roles: In many cases, caregivers don't know exactly what their role is. They're dealing with unclear responsibilities, and constantly playing the guessing game can lead to high levels of fatigue.Lack of Support: Too often, caregivers feel unsupported by their families and communities. This is why one of our top caregiver tips is to join a support group. Talking with like-minded individuals can reduce some of the mental strain.Less Independence and Privacy: When you're always wrapped up in caring for other people, you may begin to feel a lack of autonomy and privacy. So much of your time is now dedicated to someone else, and you may no longer feel like your own person.Perceived Lack of Success: Caregivers often shame themselves for not "mastering" their responsibilities or failing to achieve their goals. This perceived lack of success only further heightens stress and fatigue.What to Do If You're Suffering From Caregiver BurnoutCaregiver burnout can be triggered by a combination of causes. The good news is that there is hope for alleviating burnout and fatigue. Here are our tips for family caregivers who are exhausted and disillusioned with their role:1. Recognize Symptoms First, it's important to recognize the symptoms of caregiver stress(Opens in a new window) in yourself. Seeing the signs in others is one thing but identifying them in yourself is easier said than done. Take a moment to reflect on your mindset and note any of the following symptoms:Constant feelings of worryPersistent fatigueChanges in sleep patternsleeping too much or not enoughFeelings of sadness or angerLoss of interest in hobbiesWeight fluctuationsFrequent headaches and other painsFailing to meet other family, work and social obligations2. Set BoundariesKnowing your own limitations can significantly reduce burnout. Once you understand there's only so much you can do, make sure your family members realize these limitations as well. Keep in mind that you will never be able to control someone else's thoughts and behavior and try to focus on the positive aspects of your role.3. Acknowledge the Stress and Physical Demands Caregiving takes a huge toll on mental health, but it also has lots of physical demands. Assisting with bathing, dressing and toileting takes physical strength, and these tasks are often much more demanding than people expect. Acknowledge the challenge and seek help from an experienced home care agency, such as BrightStar Care, whenever needed. We also recommend eating a healthy diet, exercising and getting enough sleep to cope with the physical demands.4. Be Realistic About Finances Providing care to a loved one can drastically impact your finances. You may feel responsible for purchasing equipment, supplies and even medical care itself. Be realistic about these financial challenges, and don't hesitate to enlist the help of a financial planning specialist. These professionals can help you find programs that assist with paying for care.  You have several options to explore when it comes to paying for in-home care.5. Communicate Your Feelings Honestly Feeling isolated is a common symptom of caregiver burnout. The best way to avoid such feelings of isolation is to communicate your needs to those around you. When you start getting overwhelmed, talk to someone right awaywhether that's a therapist, friend or family member. Try to avoid asking "why" questions about your situation, and instead ask what's in your power to change and how you can do it.6. Manage Relationship Stress Normal family relationships are often disrupted when an older relative needs care. Parent-child roles are reversed, as a parent now needs care from their children. After all, the parent suddenly needs help from their children. Know that you may have disagreements about how things are handled and be sure to approach these from a place of empathy. Focus on positive, uplifting experiences and keep lines of communication open to all concerned family members. Be prepared for a significant emotional impact on both yourself and your loved one. 7. Follow Our Self-Care TipsOur self-care tips for caregivers are instrumental in preventing burnout. Never skip a chance to take care of yourself! This can be as simple as a bath or as big a spa day. Make sure you're always investing time in yourself and your well-being.8. Ask for Help Before You Hit a Breaking Point Don't wait until the stress has you at a breaking point. Once you take up the role of caregiver, start looking for help right away. You might reach out to other local family members and see if they'd be willing to help you with certain tasks. Finding a trusted respite care provider can also help take some of the stress off your plate.Balancing Work, Family, and Caregiving Striking a balance between caregiving and your other responsibilities can feel like an impossible task. Thankfully, BrightStar Care is here to help you balance work, family and caring for an elderly or disabled loved one. Check out our ideas for mastering this crucial balancing act:Enlist Other Family Members or Close Family Friends: Do you have other family members living in the area? Do you have close family friends in the area? If so, reach out to them and coordinate ways they can help as well. Perhaps someone can fill your role on days you're unavailable.Talk to Your Employer: Communicating your situation with your employer is essential. They may be able to offer a hybrid work schedule or telecommuting(Opens in a new window) to accommodate your needs. In some cases, asking about the Family and Medical Leave Act can be beneficial. This law allows you to leave your job temporarily and applies to many employers. Be sure to talk to your boss or HR department about whether you're eligible for FMLA leave.Schedule Family Time: Set aside separate time(Opens in a new window) to catch up with your spouse and children away from the loved one you're caring for. While you can certainly have big family get-togethers, scheduling private time with your smaller family unit ensures everyone gets their own time.Set Priorities: It's always a good idea to have a list of priorities. Decide what is the most important and what can wait until you have more time. Remember that you may have to be flexible with your priorities, and what ranks number one this week may not the next.How BrightStar Care Can Help Caring for loved ones can be overwhelming and exhausting. Fortunately, BrightStar Care offers a range of home care services that can ease the burden for family caregivers and ensure that their loved ones receive top-notch care. From companionship and transportation to medical services and skilled nursing care, our team of friendly professionals is dedicated to providing exceptional care in the comfort of home. Find a BrightStar Care Location Near YouLooking for in-home care services or assisted living for your loved one or a reliable medical staffing partner for your organization? Our experienced local care team members are ready to help. Find a location near you, contact us online or call 866.618.7827 to speak with a local care expert and learn more about how BrightStar Care offers A Higher Standard.Sources:The Caregiver Foundation