Where Can I Turn To For 24-Hour Care For Myself Or A Loved One?

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Lee Health

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Jun 16, 2021

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Florida - Southwest

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Even if you are a very independent person, there may come a time when you need 24-hour home care, either temporarily or indefinitely.
Or perhaps your loved one is already there, needing 24-hour home care help with everything from climbing out of bed to getting dressed, and everything from assistance with meals to help with bathing.
Whether the care is for you, or you are looking into 24-hour care for the elderly in their own home, todays blog should offer valuable information that can serve you now or in the future.
What Type Of Help Is Available Via 24-Hour Care Services?
The day-to-day living tasks we all take for granted until we lose a measure of mobility or need extra assistance are what a caregiver can help you or your loved one with. The types of tasks that a professional caregiver can assist with include, but are not limited to, the following:

Bathing, showering, and personal grooming
Getting dressed into daytime clothes or pajamas
Transferring from one location to another, such as out of bed or into a chair
Mobility assistance, such as help with using a cane, walker, or wheelchair
Toileting assistance and incontinence care
Prescribed exercises to help with range of motion, flexibility, and strength
Taking vital signs, including blood pressure, pulse, and respiration rates
Handling light housekeeping tasks
Preparing meals, assisting with eating, and adhering to special diets
Offering medication reminders and helping with self-administration of medicines

The caregiver is there to help you with the things you're finding difficult doing on your own. Services can be tailored to your specific needs, since you may not need assistance with every task.
The Differences Between Live-In Care And 24-Hour Care
For a number of people, its unclear what the differences are between live-in and 24 hour care. While they are similar, important differences exist.
Live-in care services refer to those provided by a certified nursing assistant (CNA) or a home health aide (HHA) living in your home. They are there to assist with daily needs, and they have a separate room available where they sleep and store their belongings. The live-in caregiver needs to have at least 8 consecutive hours of uninterrupted sleep, which means that the person being cared for needs to be able to sleep through the night without requiring help.
With 24-hour care, also referred to as around-the-clock care, CNAs and/or HHAs are available for 8- to 12-hour shifts, with two or three different caregivers working in a 24-hour period to ensure around-the-clock care. In this way, a team of dedicated caregivers provides services for full 24-hour coverage every day, all week long.
Some individuals who need 24-hour care can eventually move away from around-the-clock coverage to either live-in care or even just a few hours of personal care assistant each day.
If You'd Like To Learn More
If you are in the greater Naples, FL region and you would like to learn more about 24-hour care and whether its right for you or a loved one, give Collier Home Care a call. We will be happy to discuss your case with you and help you determine what the appropriate level of care may be.

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Lee Health is a leading healthcare provider in Southwest Florida, offering award-winning care and comprehensive services to meet the diverse needs of our community. Our mission is to provide quality service with personal attention, ensuring that every patient receives the best possible care.At Lee Health, we understand that finding the right care can be overwhelming. That's why we offer a range of services, from in-person care to virtual visits, urgent care, and emergency care, to ensure that you can access the care you need, when you need it. Our team of experienced physicians and specialists are dedicated to providing compassionate, personalized care to each and every patient.In addition to our clinical services, Lee Health is committed to providing resources and support to our community. Through our learning center, blog, and webinars, we strive to educate and empower individuals to take control of their health and wellness.As part of our commitment to excellence, Lee Health is currently conducting an evaluation of our business structure to ensure that we are meeting the highest standards of quality and efficiency. We invite you to explore our website to learn more about our services, find a doctor, and discover how Lee Health can help you and your family live healthier lives.

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Physicians 4211 Metro Parkway, Fort Myers, Florida, 33916

Lee Health is a leading healthcare provider in Southwest Florida, offering award-winning care and comprehensive services to meet the diverse needs of our community. Our mission is to provide quality service with personal attention, ensuring that every patient receives the best possible care.At Lee Health, we understand that finding the right care can be overwhelming. That's why we offer a range of services, from in-person care to virtual visits, urgent care, and emergency care, to ensure that you can access the care you need, when you need it. Our team of experienced physicians and specialists are dedicated to providing compassionate, personalized care to each and every patient.In addition to our clinical services, Lee Health is committed to providing resources and support to our community. Through our learning center, blog, and webinars, we strive to educate and empower individuals to take control of their health and wellness.As part of our commitment to excellence, Lee Health is currently conducting an evaluation of our business structure to ensure that we are meeting the highest standards of quality and efficiency. We invite you to explore our website to learn more about our services, find a doctor, and discover how Lee Health can help you and your family live healthier lives.