Don't Be The Last to Know

Posted on

Jan 12, 2011

Book/Edition

Colorado - Southern Colorado

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It may seem odd, but you may be unaware that you have a hearing loss -- or, not aware of the impact its having on others. This is because hearing loss is subtle and progressive. You lose hearing very slowly over a long period of time, and then you one day you realize you have to strain to hear your wife in a restaurant. You may think she's decided not to speak up anymore, but in reality she's speaking to you like she always has. Or, maybe one evening she says, please turn down the TV -- its hurting my ears! And, you think the volumes set like always.
So, here are a few key questions to evaluate if you have lost some hearing. Each question is designed to gain an understanding of impact your loss may be having on your daily life. These are the things that can become very frustrating for your friends and family -- even though you may not realize it. So, here you go:
Do you have a problem hearing over the telephone?
Do you have trouble following the conversation when two or more people are talking at the same time?
Do you have trouble understanding things on TV?
Do you get confused about where sounds come from?
Do you especially have trouble understanding the speech of women and children?
Do people seem to mumble?
Do people get annoyed because you misunderstand what they say?
If your answers to these questions raise concerns, I encourage you to get a free hearing checkup. For most people, there's no need to live with these problems. Todays hearing aid technology is truly remarkable!
Editors Note: This article was submitted by DigiCare with offices throughout Southern Colorado. For further information please see their ad on the Inside Front Cover or they can be reached at 719-676-3277 or via their website at www.digicarehearing.com

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