Florida - Sarasota, Manatee, Charlotte Counties

Charlotte, Manatee & Sarasota

Name

Kelly Wain

Publisher's Note


I'm Samantha Hersch your local Publisher. Please let me know how I can help you. We are Sarasota, Manatee, and Charlotte Counties most comprehensive and reliable source to find and compare Senior Housing such as Retirement Communities, Assisted Living, Memory Care, and Skilled Nursing. Health at Home options like Home Health Care, Non-Medical Home Care, Hospice and Senior Resources, and Activities and Entertainment. Whether you are looking for resources, looking to promote your business, or just want to know what's happening around town, the Seniors Blue Book website is your go-to! Our healthcare system is difficult to navigate, throw in insurance and legal issues on top, and then manage it all in a crisis… no one should have to do it alone. Let me help you. Call 941-351-3630 or email me today!  Thank you for using Seniors Blue Book, enjoy!

Florida - Sarasota, Manatee, Charlotte Counties

Browse through the most recent copy of your local SBB!

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Florida - Sarasota, Manatee, Charlotte Counties

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Local Seniors Blue Book News

Activities & Events In Your Area

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Oct 21, 2022 12:00 AM - 12:00 AM

Living Healthy Workshop

Contact Liliana Hernandez to register: workshops@aaaswfl.org I (239)652-6915

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Nov 16, 2022 12:00 AM - 12:00 AM

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Oct 31, 2022 12:00 AM - 12:00 AM

Free HHA and CNA Training!

All Stat was recently awarded a grant from the Agency for Health Care Administration (AHCA) to recruit and train new employees for the health care market. Under one of our new programs, we are offering to pay the Full Tuition ($395), CPR Class ($65) and Level II Background Screen ($84) for a total of $544 for anyone seeking to work in the Health care field. We pay 100% of the program costs as long as they agree to work with us for a minimum of 3 months.Our goal is to train 150 new employees who can be working in the local market as Home Health Aides or Certified Nursing Assistants.

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Nov 01, 2022 12:00 AM - 12:00 AM

Living with Loss

Contact April Moschlni at April@neurochallenge.org or call 941-926-6413

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Let’s get started in your Personal Search.

Local Aging Options

Pines of Sarasota

Assisted Living 1501 N. Orange Ave., Sarasota, Florida, 34236

Pines of Sarasota Assisted Living is a residential community designed to offer residents exceptional value and homelike comfort. With more than 70 years of experience in senior care services, we have learned how important it is to respect individual independence while standing by with a helping hand or a friendly escort wherever you're going. Our caring team provides the right level of assistance so you can experience the most each day.- 39 completely remodeled living residences- 24/7 on-site assistance- Restaurant-style dining with adjoining cafe- Beautiful landscaped gardens- All-inclusive care pricingPines of Sarasota provides the assistance you need to maintain the independence you desire. Be one of the first to call Pines Assisted Living 'home'. A lifestyle provided with care at a price you can afford.

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Alloro at University Groves

Independent Living 3560 Broadway Ave., Sarasota, Florida, 34243

Luxury Senior Living Coming Soon to Sarasota, FL With countless high-end amenities, spacious apartments, and an award-winning social and activities calendar, The Alloro at University Groves is the premier choice for any active adult, aged 55 and older, seeking a maintenance-free and carefree lifestyle. Unparalleled luxury in the heart of Sarasota. Experience the peak in independent, active-lifestyle senior living, featuring beautiful, spacious apartments, top-of the line amenities and an award-winning social and activities calendar.

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Discovery Commons South Biscayne

Memory Care 6235 Hoffman St., North Port, Florida, 34287

Choosing Assisted Living is a major step and not something to be taken lightly. At Discovery Commons at South Biscayne, we see the power of supportive senior living every day. By individualizing care plans for each resident, our caring staff is able to meet them at their individual level of need. Free from mundane tasks like housework and home maintenance, residents have more time and energy to invest in the variety of engaging opportunities at our lively community. Our private studio, one, and two bedroom apartment homes are built for comfort. Pet-friendly floor plans come with energy-efficient appliances, including a full-sized refrigerator and microwave. Assisted Living residents also enjoy the culinary and social pleasures of our elegant dining room, as well as the convenience of a well-equipped fitness studio, onsite beauty salon and spa, and transportation services.

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Discovery Commons At Bradenton

Memory Care 2614 43rd St. W., Bradenton, Florida, 34209

Discovery Commons At Bradenton is a licensed assisted living residence dedicated to providing quality services in a warm, comfortable environment. We offer professional, personalized services designed to enhance the quality of life for those we serve. We have been serving the needs of senior adults since 1990 and remain dedicated to those who entrust their housing and service needs to us. At Discovery Commons At Bradenton, we are dedicated to each resident's independence, choices, and dignity. Visit us for a tour, and you'll see how our combination of a warm residential setting along with the caring, helpful staff at Discovery Commons At Bradenton is just the right choice for your housing or service needs

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Articles Written By Local Businesses

Alzheimer’s: Caregiving After the Diagnosis

For more information on the author ,Heart Body & Mind Home Care, CLICK HERE!Now that your family member or friend has received a diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease its important to learn as much as you can about the disease and how to care for someone who has it. At Heart, Body & Mind Home Care, we feel that it is important for family members to know the right way to share the news with other family and friends.Sometimes, you may feel that you don't know how to care for the person with Alzheimer's. This is a common feeling among caregivers of people with Alzheimer's because each day may bring different challenges. Learning about the disease can help you understand and cope with these challenges .Heart, Body & Mind Home Care offers free information about Alzheimer's disease for families and caregivers.Learning About Alzheimer'sAlzheimer's disease is an illness of the brain. It causes large numbers of nerve cells in the brain to die. This affects a persons ability to remember things and think clearly. People with Alzheimer's become forgetful and easily confused and may have a hard time concentrating. They may have trouble taking care of themselves and doing basic things like making meals, bathing, and getting dressed.Alzheimer's varies from person to person .It can progress faster in some people than in others ,and not everyone will have the same symptoms. In general, though, Alzheimer's takes many years to develop, becoming increasingly severe overtime. As the disease gets worse, people need more help. Eventually, they require total care.Alzheimer's disease consists of three main stages: mild (sometimes called early-stage), moderate, and severe (some time called late stage). Understanding these stages can help you care for your loved one and plan ahead.Mild Alzheimer's DiseaseIn the mild stage of Alzheimer's ,people often have some memory loss and small changes in personality. They may have trouble remembering recent events or the names off similiar people or things. They may no longer be able to solve simple math problems or balance a check book. People with mild Alzheimer's also slowly lose the ability to plan and organize. For example, they may have trouble making a grocery list and finding it  in the store.Moderate Alzheimer's DiseaseIn the moderate stage of Alzheimer's, memory loss and confusion become more obvious. People have more trouble organizing, planning and following instructions. They may need help getting dressed and may start having problems with bladder or bowel control. People with moderate Alzheimer's may have trouble recognizing family members and friends. They may not know where they are or what day or year it is. People with moderate stage Alzheimer's may also begin to wander, so they should not be left alone. Personality changes can become more serious. For example, people may make threats or accuse others of stealing.Severe Alzheimer's DiseaseIntheseverestageofAlzheimers,peopleusuallyneedhelpwithalloftheirdailyneeds. They may not be able to walk or sit up without help .They may not be able to talk and often cannot recognize family members. They may also have trouble swallowing and therefore refuse to eat.Tips from Heart, Body & Mind Home CareSofar,thereisnocureforAlzheimers,buttherearetreatmentsthatcanpreventsome symptoms from getting worse for a limited time. Below are some ways that you can learn more about Alzheimer's disease.If you have a family member who is a client of Heart, Body & Mind Home Care you have access to our FREE online Family Learning Center that contains more than 50 family caregiver training videos and resources.Talk with a doctor or other healthcare provider who specializes in Alzheimer's disease.Checkout books or videos about Alzheimer's from the library.Got o educational programs about the disease.Findasupportgroupforcaregivers,ideallyoneinwhichmembersaretaking care of someone who is in the same stage of Alzheimer's as the person for whom you are caring.You may also contact Heart, Body & Mind Home Care for additional free information regarding Alzheimer's or request a FREE in-home consultation.Talking with Family and FriendsWhen you learn that someone has Alzheimer's disease, you may wonder when and how to tell your family and friends. You may also be worried about how others may react to or treat the person. Others often sense that something is wrong before they are told. Alzheimer's disease is hard to keep secret. When the time seems right, be honest with family, friends, and others. Use this as a chance to educate them about Alzheimer's disease. You can share information to help them understand what you and the person with Alzheimer's are going through. You can also tell them what you can do to help.Listed below are suggestions of how you can help family and friends understand how to interact with the person who has Alzheimer's.Help them realize what the person can still do and how much he or she can still understand.Givethemsuggestionsabouthowtostarttalkingwiththeperson.Forexample, Hello George, Im John .We used to work together.Help them avoid correcting the person with Alzheimer's if  he or she makes a mistake or for gets something.Helpthemplanfunactivitieswiththeperson,suchasgoingtofamilyreunionsor visiting old friends.Helping Children Understand Alzheimer'sIf the person with Alzheimer's has young children or grandchildren, you can help them understand what is happening. Answer their questions simply and honestly. For example, you might tell a young child Grandma has an illness that makes it hard for her to remember things. Know that their feelings of sadness and anger are normal. Comfort them. Tell them they did'nt cause the disease.If the child lives with someone who has Alzheimer's, don't expect him or her to babysit the person. Make sure the child has time for his or her own interests and needs, such as playing with friends and going to school activities. Spend time with the child, so that he or she does'nt feel that all your attention is on the person with Alzheimer's. Many younger children will look to you to see how to act around the person with Alzheimer's disease. Show children that they can still talk with the person and help them enjoy things. Doing fun things together, like arts and crafts or looking through photo albums, can help both the child and the person with Alzheimer's.Challenges for TeensA teenager might  find it  hard to accept how the person with Alzheimer's has changed. He or she may find the changes upsetting or embarrassing or not want to be around the person. Talk with teenagers about their concerns and feelings. Dont force them to spend time with the person who has Alzheimer's.

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What Should You Know Before Buying Hearing Aids?

For information on the author, Hearing Clinic of Venice, CLICK HERE!According to the National Institute of Deafness and Other Communication Disorders, an estimated 28-million Americans could greatly gain from putting on hearing aids. Unluckily, the recent hearing aids statistics show that only three million hearing devices are used in the United States.That said, it leaves many people with hearing loss devoid of any help. And unfortunately, a lot of people who experience hearing loss wait for at least 15 years until they buy their initial hearing aids.What To Know Before Buying Hearing AidsNow that you have decided to improve your life and hearing quality, what next? As an intelligent buyer, there are some things you must consider before you make a purchase. It is important to note that hearing aids come indifferent brands, sizes, shapes, stylesand numerous features that might seem very puzzling if it is your first time. It is also vital to note that every variation alters the final costs of the hearing aid. So, even before buying one, it is essential to think of the following.A Hearing Aid Wont Bring Back Your Normal HearingWhen it comes to how you used to hear things, wearing a hearing aid will be different. You will notice a significant difference between the ways you used to hear things. Therefore, ensure that you have reasonable and practical expectations. Besides, even a good hearing aid will not restore normal hearing.Size Doesn't MatterSize is the last thing that should concern you when choosing a hearing aid for your needs. Never let the small size puzzle you. In most cases, bigger doesn't mean better, and in fact, some hearing aids might be small and stealthy and be very good when it comes to functionality. You might think that the small device wont be as effective as the big ones; however, the mechanism in the small hearing aid is just as effective as the latter.You Must Have A Hearing Test DoneThe initial step of your curative journey is admitting that you need hearing aids. On the other hand, you will need first to consult your audiologist to make a hearing test. There are various stages of a hearing test that check your hearing capability. A pure-tone audiometry assessment is used to help identify the quickest frequencies you can or cannot perceive.In contrast, people with regular hearing can perceive up to less than 25 decibels, technically the sound of a murmur. On the other hand, simple hearing loss means that you can hardly perceive the sound of a lawnmower, which is almost four times the sound of a whisper, 90 decibels.In addition, pure-tone audiometry will help define the frequencies you can perceive well. For instance, some people cannot hear high-pitched or bass sounds. Also, other tests can be done to help determine word identification in a large crowd; all these results will help the audiologist create the perfect hearing aid that suits your needs.Hearing Aids Must Suit Your Needs And LifestyleEveryone is different, and there is never a thing like one size fits everything. Hearing devices have various topographies that can aid enhance your experience only if they are tailored to suit your requirements. For example, some wearers might prefer a hearing aid with a wireless Bluetooth streaming feature that can unswervingly stream auditory files from their phones or TV to the device.On the other hand, noise cancellation can be another preference for some people, especially those who labor in noisy environments. This function stops background sounds from disturbing your hearing. Some hearing aids have a noise cancellation feature that is expected to catch wind noises, for instance, in-the-ear and behind-the-ear hearing aids.The Best Hearing Aids Will Offer More Than AmplificationMake sure that you look for a style that will offer more than just a speaker. Try checking various available features, so you will know you are getting one that suits your needs. What do you want to achieve with the device? Begin by making a priority list and bring the list with you when shopping.Know The Battery Life SpanA large unit hearing aid can be less stealthy but will likely cost you more. On the other hand, a small hearing aid will need small batteries that might need to be replaced often. So, when shopping, make sure that you take your time. This will help you choose the right hearing aid for your budget.There Are Various Types Of Hearing DevicesThe main types of hearing aids are:In the earBehind the earIn the canalReceiver in canal

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What to Ask About Assisted Living

When seniors or their families start looking at assisted living communities there are several important questions everyone should ask. Most of these are pretty obvious size, cost, location, etc. But then there are the less obvious things that may not pop into your mind right away, but may actually turn out to be a deal breaker.Here are some questions gathered from the experiences of other seniors. Take a look, mull them over, add your own and then ask the ones that you think will make a difference in whether your senior living experience is terrible or terrific.Keep in mind that not all of these things will be important to you. And just because one of them is an issue for someone else, it might not matter to you at all. Also, there is no right and wrong answer. For instance, some seniors might prefer to bring their own furniture to make a place feel like home, while others might not want the hassle or expense of buying new or moving it.So if something really important doesn't meet your expectations, consider it a possible deal breaker. Or if several of the lessor issues all come up on the wrong side of your list, you need to give that assisted living community a little more thought before packing your bags and moving in. Take a look.For anyone:How many residents live there?What is the ratio of staff to residents?What are the living accommodations like an apartment, single room with private bath, single room with a shared bath or double room?Is furniture provided or do you need to bring your own? What will fit?Can residents put things on the walls? Do you do it yourself or does maintenance do it for you?Is there a nurse on staff?What types of activities do they do with residents?Do they expect everyone to take part in activities?Do they remind or invite residents to join in or do you need to remember and come down on your own?Are the activities appropriate for the residents age, memory, interests and ability?Can you have a pet? Are there restrictions? Who is responsible for the pet?Do they offer transportation? As a group or individual rides? What is the cost per one-way trip?Are there rehab or physical therapy services on site?Can you choose where and with whom you want to eat or are you assigned?What is the food like? What's a typical, breakfast, lunch and dinner? Is there ever a choice or does everyone get the same thing (unless they have special needs).How do they accommodate special food needs? (Gluten free, diabetic, etc.)Are there visiting hours? Can visitors dine with the resident? Is there a charge? Are reservations needed?How does the waiting list work? Is there a deposit required to be on the list? How much? Does that amount go toward the monthly fee or to the company? Is it refundable if you change your mind?What happens if you aren't ready when they call with an opening? Do you drop to the bottom of the list?For those who need very little assistance:Can the residents suggest or organize activities?Is there parking available? Inside or outside? Is there an extra charge for parking?Are there laundry facilities or is laundry provided? Is there an extra fee?Is housekeeping included?Can you cook in your apartment?Can you choose to only eat part of your meals with the group? Do you only pay for meals you eat?How active/social are most of the residents?Do they offer any outings? Where? How often?For those with mild dementia or physical limitations requiring more assistance:Does anyone assist residents with activities?How is medicine handled? Is enough water provided to swallow a pill? How do they prepare pills if they're large and difficult to swallow?Is there a bedtime or curfew? What time do they help residents get ready for bed? What time is lights out? What if you're a night owl? Can you stay up longer? What time do they start getting people up in the morning? Is it done room by room or do they take into consideration that some people just wake up earlier or prefer to sleep later?How often do residents get baths or showers?Can they accommodate two-person transfers?What type of clothes do they suggest for residents? (e.g. whatever you choose or easy to pull on outfits?)How is laundry done? How often? Is it done individually or more than one persons clothing at a time? How do they make sure clothes are returned to the correct room?What do they do if clothes or personal items go missing? How do they find it?If snacks are included, are they given to everyone or just people who ask or just if those at an activity?Can you have their own food in your room?What supplies are provided? (e.g. shampoo, body wash, toothpaste, Depends, etc.). What happens when the resident runs out of something? Do they have extra in stock or do they send someone for it? If so, how are you charged for that? Do they expect a family member to go get it?Now that you've reached the bottom of the list, don't let these questions overwhelm you! And don't worry. Quality senior living communities, are here to help.Aston Gardens At Pelican Pointe is a premier senior living community in Venice, Florida. Our state-of-the-art community offers multiple levels of care for aging adults, including independent senior living, assisted living, and memory care. Learn more about our senior living programs by CLICKING HERE!

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Caring for a family member

For more information on the author, Edward Jones, CLICK HERE!Life doesn't happen in neat little boxes. Everything overlaps. While you're dealing with multiple priorities, we have multiple ways to support you.That's why your Edward Jones financial advisor asks questions to understand what's important to you. Once we understand your priorities, we can help you document specific goals. Then, together, we can develop personalized financial strategies based on your risk tolerance and current financial picture to help you achieve them.Below are some things to consider if you are caring for a child or helping an aging parent.Child to support?Supporting a child doesn't have to mean placing your retirement and other goals on hold .There are loans for college but not for retirement. So you may decide to focus on contributing to your 401(k) and/or Roth vs traditional IRA. However, if you feel strongly about helping your kids go through college relatively debt-free, you may want to focus more on your college savings options.We don't believe you have to pick one goal over the other. Remember, there are ways to balance the goals of saving for education and retirement.Caring for an aging parent?You may need to juggle your financial goals with the needs of your aging parents. Even if you don't have to contribute financially, you may need to spend time and energy making sure your parents situation remains positive.Use our financial checklist to help you navigate caring for an aging parent

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Job Opportunities Near You

BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT DIRECTOR

Mission Statement: To Improve the quality of life of people with Parkinsons and their caregivers, today.Position Summary: The Business Development Director (BDD) is an integral part of the Neuro Challenge Foundation (NCF) for Parkinsons dynamic team of professionals. Reporting to the CEO, the BDD is responsible for the planning and execution of Neuro Challenges earned income events/businesses including securing sponsorships for events and the newly created Neuro Challenge Network business plan. Developing income producing corporate partnerships with healthcare and other stakeholders is a significantly important part of the job.Qualifications: Requires excellent interpersonal and problem-solving skills and sales experience, preferably in the healthcare or education field; ability to multi-task in a fast-paced environment; excellent organizational and communication skills; time management and prioritization skills; proficiency in Microsoft databases including Excel and Word. Experience in a non-profit organization, managing volunteers, consultants, and staff, and working in a health care setting is highly desirable.DUTIES AND RESPONSIBILITIES: Income Generationo Plays the lead role in the retainment of current sponsors and the development and securing of new event sponsors for the Parkinsons Expo.o Oversee aspects of the execution of the Neuro Challenge Network business plan, including but not limited to, sale of Parkinsons Disease educational content and marketing collateral developmento Provides input on training content selection and creation, product creation, and delivery platformso Work closely with marketing and communications manager to determine appropriate marketing and advertising channels online and in print.o Assists in the creation and monitoring of income goals and event budgets.o Achieve income goals for the Parkinsons Expo and Neuro Challenge Network business. Board of Directorso Work with Board Members, as needed, to achieve related goals.o Provide reports to the Board of Directors, as requested Communicationso Responsible for communicating with past, current and prospective sponsors regarding all aspects of the events.o Communicates with staff regarding the status of event sponsorshipso Work with the Marketing and Communications Manager to ensure the NCF website, e-news and information documents are current and accurate.o Represent NCF at community events as needed. Sponsor and Client Stewardshipo Maintains relationships with sponsors who support NCF events. Must abide by NCF and America Fundraising Professionals codes of conduct. Ensure compliance with all agency policies and procedures regarding confidentiality. Other activities as assigned.SKILLS AND QUALIFICATIONS: Dependability Advanced business acumen skills Able to develop synergistic solutions Highly organized Exceptional prioritization and time management skills Detail-oriented Ability to work within a team and independently Excellent written and verbal communication Proficiency in Microsoft Office Skills Bachelors level degree or higher Self-motivated go-getterTRAINING REQUIREMENTS: Participate in opportunities to learn about Parkinsons disease All NCF mandatory trainingsACCOUNTABILITY: Supervised by the CEOCOMPENSATION: Salary range is $50,000 plus commission.CLASSIFICATION: This position is classified as full time, exempt. Mostly 8-5 Monday through Friday. However, weekend and evening work on occasion is required. The BDD currently does not supervise employees but that will change as the Neuro Challenge Network business grows.Every incidental duty connected with the BDD position cannot be specified in the job description and the BDD, at the discretion of CEO, may be required to perform duties that are not included in this job description.TO APPLY: Send your cover letter and resume to info@neurochallenge.org

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Home Health Aide & Certified Nursing Assistant

All Stat was recently awarded a grant from the Agency for Health Care Administration (AHCA) to recruit and train new employees for the health care market. Under one of our new programs, we are offering to pay the Full Tuition ($395), CPR Class ($65) and Level II Background Screen ($84) for a total of $544 for anyone seeking to work in the Health care field. We pay 100% of the program costs as long as they agree to work with us for a minimum of 3 months.Our goal is to train 150 new employees who can be working in the local market as Home Health Aides or Certified Nursing Assistants.

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Continuum Care Hospice Job Openings

We are growing and expanding our hospice team. Looking for the following positions:Board Certified Music TherapistHospice ChaplainOn-call hospice experienced RNs/LPNSRN Case ManagersCNAs

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